Class Announcements: 2011


12/29/2011 --The Memorials page has information on the deaths of classmates Connie Sidamon-Eristoff on December 26, 2011, and of Dick Glass on December 11, with their photos from the 1952 Nassau Herald.
 
12/23/11 -- Click here for PAW Class Notes for February 8, 2012 in the Secretary's page. Classmates noted are Bill Carey, Coke Florance, George Stevens, Irv Cohen, Chuck Carpenter, Phil McMaster, Pat Russell, Cliff Barr, Mike Ely, Ray Baldwin, Ben Harer, Wladyslaw Troka and Dick Glass.
 
12/17/11 -- Go to Class News to read about the University's establishment of the Stanley J. Seeger '52 Center for Hellenic Studies.
 
12/16/11 -- Aaron Harber '75 has sent us a link to his outstanding TV interview with our Jim Baker. To view the program, readers can simply go to http://harbertv.com/Baker.html.

12/15/11 -- Bob Lovell has brought to our attention a short video of Dick Kazmaier reminiscing on Tiger football success 60 years later.  To see it, go to
http://www.goprincetontigers.com/ViewArticle.dbml?SPSID=46859&SPID=4263&DB_LANG=C&DB_OEM_ID=10600&ATCLID=205343673.
Copy and paste if the link doesn't work directly.
 
11/28/11 -- Classmate Wladyslaw Troka died November 9.
 
11/28/11 -- Dan's PAW submission for January 18, 2012, on the Secretary's page, reports on the memorial service for Harry and Elinor Emlet, attended by Barry and Jean Loper, Steve and Kent Rogers, and George Towner, and family news from Leigh Smith, Weber, Hudgens, Buxton, Cleland, Spencer, Jones, and Higgins. He notes that Lou Parsons died November 3.
 
10/31/11 -- Click here for Dan Duffield's Class Notes for the December 14 PAW on the Secretary's page. Mentioned are Marty Battestin, John Birkelund, Jim Brereton, Tom Daubert, Bill Gough, Ben Moore, Bill Murdoch, Dick Orr, John Parker, John Pratt, Jim Rockwell and Bill Wilshire.
 
10/20/11 -- Classmate Bill Wilshire died in Kitty Hawk, NC on October 16. Click here for an extensive Obituary on the Memorials page.

10/11/11 -- Click here for Dan Duffield's Class Notes for November 16 on the Secretary's page. Mentioned are classmates Arnold Barnes, John Fox, J.J. Hall, Stanley Seeger. Roger Berlind, Al Prus, Irving Portner, Harry Emlet and Frank Driggs.

9/28/11 -- Frank Driggs '52 died in his Manhattan apartment on September 20. Click here for an inclusive obituary from the New York Times for September 26 on the Memorials page.

9/16/11 -- Click here for Dan Duffield's Class Notes for October 26 on the Secretary's page. They feature classmates and close friends Dave Hawks, Hobey Henderson and the late Marsh Arnold.

9/6/11 -- Click here for accounts of the highway deaths of Harry Emlet '52 and his wife, Elinor in Northern Virginia on September 4.

8/31/11 -- Click here for Dan Duffield's Class Notes for October 5 on the Secretary's page. Mentioned are classmates Roger Berlind, Roy Lawrence,Joe  Bolster (and  Tink and their 14 offspring) and Marsh Arnold.

8/14/11 -- Classmate Marshall Arnold, Jr. died in San Clemente, CA on August 10. Click here for a brief obituary on the Memorials page.

8/8/11 -- Click here to see Dan Duffield's Class Notes for September 14 on the Secretary's page. Mentioned are classmates Joe Bolster, Don Malehorn, Ed Masinter, Warren McCabe, Gus Middleton, George Aman, Rudy Lehnert, Barry Loper, Roger McLean, Bill Murdoch, Steve Rogers, Charlie Schaefer, Henry Sherk, Mike Ely, Barrie Sparling, Arthur Komar, Stanley Seeger and Will Garwood; associate Jean McNelis and departed wives Ann Middleton, Patty Clutz, Peg Brodsky and B.J. Emery.

7/20/11-- Classmate Will Garwood died in Austin, TX on July 14. Click here for an extensive obituary on the Memorials page.

7/15/11 -- Stanley Seeger '52 died on June 24 in London. Click here for an obituary on the Memorials page and for a link to the New York Times obituary.

6/29/11 -- Click here for a brief obit on classmate Barrie D. Sparling on the Memorials page.
 
5/26/11 -- Click here to see notes on recently deceased classmates Vic Bihl,  Nels Hobart, Arthur Komar, Don McDonough, Karl Roebling and Fred Slivon on the Memorials page.

5/5/11 -- Click here to see class notes for the July 6 issue of the PAW on the Secretary's Page. Featured are classmates John Moore, Marshall Keating, Bob Diefenbach, Ed Masinter, George Hambleton, associate Kathryn Forgan, Roger Berlind, Steve Rogers, Bill Murdoch, Karl Roebling, Fred Slivon, Don McDonough, Vic Bihl and honoraries, Mary Murdoch and Shirley Tilghman.

5/1/11 -- Click here to see class Notes for the June 1 and (belatedly) the April 6 issues of the PAW on the Secretary's Page. Classmates featured on June 1 are Porter Hopkins, Joe Bolster,  Dave Paton, Jim Baker, Bill Carey, George Gowen, George Hambleton, Barney McHenry, Duncan Stephens, Dick Kazmaier, Paul Piret, Richard Hudgens,  Roger Berlind and Al West. Featured on April 6 are Classmates Bill Murdoch, Bob Doherty, Geoff Nunes, Jim Brereton, Irv Cohen, Jack Giordano, Herb Kaufman, John Parker, George Aman, John Clutz, Davis Roach, Walt Weidler and Honoraries Mary Murdoch and Anne Sherrerd.

4/17/11 -- Click here for an updated list of attendees at Mini XXV, NYC - April 29 to May 1 on the Reunions Page.  Also - program substitution: instead of the Metropolitan Opera tour, a program at the Juilliard School at Lincoln Center, including a tour by the President of the Juilliard School of the Peter Jay Sharp (P '52) Theater.

4/7/11 -- Click here to see Class Notes for the May 11 issue of the PAW on the Secretary's Page. Classmates featured are John Parker, Bob Oakley, Frank Carlucci, Don Oberdorfer, Hal Saunders, Sam Van Culin, George Newlin, Dom Telesco, Bob Worth, Roger McLean, Bob McLean,Quincey Lumsden, Roger Berlind, Joe Bolster, Reinhard Loosch, Purd Wright and Nelson Hobart.

4/2/11 -- Click here for information on how to order classmate Dr. David Paton's new memoir Second Sight: Views From An Eye Doctor's Odyssey.
 
3/28/11 -- Click here to see Class Notes for the 4/27 issue of the PAW on the Secretary's page. Classmates featured are: Jim Baker, Hal Saunders, Chuck Carpenter, Steve Rogers, Bob Oakley, Bill Murdoch, Ben Harer, Jack Collins, Quincey Lumsden, Bob Worth and Bob McLean. These notes are the first sent from Dan Duffield's newly-acquired computer.
 
3/25/11 -- In light of the current debate on campus about the bicker system and the eating clubs, James C. Parham '52 has sent the Alumni Weekly a letter on our Class's experience with the famous "100 percent bicker" of 1950.  Poss was our President during undergraduate years and Alumni Trustee of the University in 1976-80.  We hope his letter will appear in the PAW, but in the meantime you can go to the Class News page to read what Poss has written.
 
3/10/11 -- Click hereto see the Treasurer's Report for fiscal 2010 ended June 30, 2010 and for the first half of fiscal 2011 ended December 31, 2010.

3/9/11 -- Don Malehorn reports the death of classmate Reinhard Loosch on March 8, 2011. Click here for a mention on the Memorials page.

2/23/11 -- Click here to see the Class Notes from the 3/2/11 issue of the PAW on the Secretary's page. Mentioned are Jock Bickert, Bob Flinn, Quincey Lumsden, Charlie Shriver, Jim Laughlin, Ed Tiryakian, Banks Anderson, Bob Jiranek, Bill Pritchard, Paul Troutman, Bob Eby, Marshall Keating, Bill Carey, Bill Carson, George Hambleton, Ed Masinter, John Moore, Bob Worth, Biddle Worthington, Jack Smart and Andy Deiss.

2/8/11 -- Click here to see the Class Notes from the 2/9/11 issue of the PAW on the Secretary's page. Mentioned are Paul Pressler, Tom Dosdall, Paul Piret, Ben Moore, Frank Sparrow, Russell Pierce and Al Gilgen.
Class Notes also mention an interview with Dick Riordan in the Los Angeles Times. Click here for excerpts on the Class News page.

2/1/11 -- We have learned of the recent deaths of classmates Andy Deiss on December 25, 2010 and Walt Weidler on January 21, 2011. Click here for their information on the Memorials Page.

1/5/11 -- Click here for the detailed program followed by a registration form for Mini XXV to be held in New York City April 28 through May 1, 2011. Feel free to use this form if you haven't received one already. Note the January 15 deadline. The committee could use a few good men - and women.

Princeton establishes Stanley J. Seeger '52 Center for Hellenic Studies

Posted November 22, 2011; 09:17 a.m.

Building on its 30-year history of developing one of the nation's leading programs in Hellenic studies, Princeton University has established the Stanley J. Seeger '52 Center for Hellenic Studies to consolidate and expand its research activities, international initiatives, scholarly exchanges and offerings in the classroom.

The Program in Hellenic Studies, founded in 1981, enrolls about 200 undergraduate and graduate students a year in academic study and supports more than 100 Princetonians for international travel, study and research. The new center will enhance the Hellenic studies curriculum by establishing new academic positions, adding faculty members, strengthening the graduate curriculum and expanding opportunities for study in Greece and the Hellenic Mediterranean. It is named for alumnus Stanley J. Seeger, Class of 1952, in honor of his extensive contributions to the University's endeavors in Hellenic studies.

"I am delighted that Hellenic studies has assumed the name of its foremost benefactor," said President Shirley M. Tilghman. "For more than three decades, Stanley Seeger nurtured what is now one of the world's great centers for the study of Greece and the transformative influence of Greek ideas across times and cultures. Although we mourn his recent passing, Stanley's love of Greece and commitment to learning will continue to enrich the lives of our students and faculty, as well as the world of Hellenic scholarship, for many, many years to come."

Seeger, who died last July, earned a bachelor's degree in music from Princeton in 1952 and a master's degree in fine arts in 1956. He donated $2 million to Princeton in 1979 to create the Stanley. J. Seeger Hellenic Fund, providing the foundation for the University's Hellenic programs, and continued to contribute additional funds over the years.

Seeger's gifts have allowed the University to build a world-class collection of research resources, rare and unique books, manuscripts, photographs, and objects in the University libraryand the Princeton University Art Museumto support scholarship and teaching. In addition, they have funded faculty and student travel to Greece, a crucial element of for the study of Hellenic culture.

"Stanley's legacy is legendary," said Dimitri Gondicas, a member of the Class of 1978, who was appointed the first Stanley J. Seeger Director of the Center over the summer and who has served as the program's executive director since its inception. "Through his gifts to Hellenic studies, he has touched the lives of thousands of students and scholars, Princetonians, as well their counterparts from Greece and all over the world. He has made possible many unique academic and cultural opportunities. The range and impact of his generosity are truly extraordinary."

The new Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies, established last May, "focuses on research, broadly defined, and has a wider horizon as one of the University's windows to the outside world, contributing in a major way to the University's new initiatives fostering the internationalization of the curriculum, excellence in undergraduate education, the promotion of the creative and performing arts, and the multicultural character of the University community," Gondicas said.

The Program in Hellenic Studies, which is being directed by classics professor Christian Wildberg, will continue to function with a focus on the teaching of undergraduate and graduate students, as an integral part and primary focus of the center. Since 1996, the program has awarded a certificate in Hellenic studies to between three and seven undergraduates a year.

The mission of the center is to oversee, fund, initiate and manage study and research on all aspects of Hellenic studies at Princeton. The center will sponsor a broad range of activities: fellowship programs, international initiatives, collections development, publications, interdepartmental projects, institutional collaborations, campus events, fundraising and alumni relations.

According to Gondicas, a major next step in furthering Princeton's presence in Greece is the recently signed collaboration with the Benaki Museum in Athens. Led by the Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies and the Princeton University Art Museum, this collaboration will provide opportunities for international exchanges in the art and museum worlds, including long-term loans and exhibitions, with a focus on the ethical management of cultural property. The partnership also will bring to the Princeton campus artists from abroad, while showcasing in Greece and the broader region Princeton's collections and the best of contemporary American culture and the arts.

"This is another great moment for Hellenic studies at Princeton," said Dean of the Faculty David Dobkin. "The program has thrived, and the center provides an opportunity to take its activities to the next level. This also is a wonderful way to acknowledge a very forward-looking gift from Stanley J. Seeger in 1979."

For much of the 20th century, the University has played a leading role among American institutions in the development of Hellenic studies. Princeton's faculty members have included several prominent figures in the field, such as former professor of comparative literature Robert Fagles, internationally known for his translations of Homer, and emeritus professor of English Edmund Keeley, whose acclaimed translations of modern Greek poetry offered to the English-speaking world the works of C.P. Cavafy and Greek Nobel Laureates George Seferis and Odysseus Elytis, all published by Princeton University Press.

Currently, about 150 undergraduates are enrolled in the 20 courses offered by the Hellenic studies program each year. At the graduate level, more than 100 doctoral degrees have been awarded in the last 30 years to students affiliated with or supported by the Program in Hellenic Studies. The summer fellowship program has sent 1,500 Princetonians — undergraduates, graduate students, faculty and staff — to Greece and the Hellenic Mediterranean for study, research, internships and excavations.

Each year, the Hellenic studies program brings as many as 45 scholars, artists and writers from around the world to Princeton for three-month residences on campus as visiting fellows. The postdoctoral program, which counts a total of 85 participants over its history, has placed former fellows in academic posts at major universities in the United States and Europe.

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Poss Parham has submitted the following for publication in the Princeton Alumni Weekly -
mainly to enlighten younger Tigers, but also to refresh our minds about a seminal event in our undergraduate years:
 

Clubs and Class of ’52 Petition

 

 

In light of the current review of social life at Princeton, some of the younger Princetonians might be interested in the experience of the Class of ‘52 in the Bicker of 1950.  For years before that, the Clubs had extended invitations to a large majority of all Sophomores often leaving 15% to 20% without access to a Club.  The Class of ’52 decided to circulate a petition declaring that, unless every member of our Class received a bid, none of us would join.  The text read:

 

"As a result of the failure of last spring’s bicker to include 20% of the Sophomore eligibles, and the failure of the clubs to guarantee that this condition will be remedied in the coming bicker, we members of the Sophomore Class feel it necessary for us to demand that all men admitted to Princeton be accepted into the social system of the upperclass years as well as the academic life of the University.

 

"Wishing to express ourselves in the most effective way possible, we, the undersigned, do hereby resolve to abstain from joining any eating club unless each Sophomore eligible is given a bid.  In signing this petition, we pledge our honor as gentlemen to adhere to its provisions.  (This petition will be invalid unless 600 names are secured.)”

 

News of the petition produced turmoil at Princeton and among alumni, but by early December 1949, 625 class members had signed up.  The controversy continued and heightened.  Some considered the petition an outrageous threat to the Clubs—and others would eliminate the Clubs altogether.  Bicker time came, and after maximum efforts by the Clubs and the Interclub Committee, the Prince was able to announce on March 9, 1950:  "All Sophs Get Bids.”  We believe that this was the first time "100%” was achieved in a Club Bicker. 

 

The 1952 Class petition was not an attempt to destroy the Clubs.  It was an attempt to make them better.  Unlike many other college social systems, the Clubs were the only dining and social facilities for Princeton juniors and seniors.  The few who were excluded from the Clubs had their meals in Commons with freshmen and sophomores, or on their own, and no social facilities. 

 

I believe that the Clubs have been a unique and valuable part of life at Princeton.  They provide larger community groups than sororities and fraternities and a more congenial variety of members than have the residential colleges with which I have been familiar (Yale and Oxford).  I hope that the Clubs will be retained in the final plan. 
 

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Classmate Dr. David Paton's New Book


            Classmate Dr. David Paton, founder of ORBIS International, is to be honored for his life and achievements at a dinner on April 6 at the Century Association in New York City.  The event recognizes David's outstanding service, especially in developing countries, where ORBIS has provided eye surgery and is dedicated to saving sight and eliminating avoidable blindness.  The program is described in more detail on page 514 of our 50th reunion Book of Our History.  The Honorable James A. Baker III '52 is co-chair for the April 6 event.  


           David has subsequently told us that the dinner is sold out, but it will also be the occasion for the official release of David's just published memoir,  Second Sight: Views From An Eye Doctor's Odyssey.  The book is now available on Amazon.com. (Several other authors have used "second sight" in their titles, unfortunately, thus making it helpful to use the full title above to find the book.)  Proceeds from the dinner and from the book will be used in part to support a new Global Ophthalmology Fellowship at ORBIS International.

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Bicker 1950
 

3/25/2011  To provide some background for the current debate on the eating club selection system, Poss Parham - James C. Parham '52 - has written a letter to the Alumni Weekly about our experience in 1950, the year of the famous 100 percent bicker.    Here is the text of his letter.
 

In light of the current review of social life at Princeton, some of the younger Princetonians might be interested in the experience of the Class of ’52 in the Bicker of 1950.  For years before that, the Clubs had extended invitations to a large majority of all Sophomores often leaving 15% to 20% without access to a Club.  The Class of ’52 decided to circulate a petition declaring that, unless every member of our Class received a bid, none of us would join.  The text read:

 

"As a result of the failure of last spring’s bicker to include 20% of the Sophomore eligibles, and the failure of the clubs to guarantee that this condition will be remedied in the coming bicker, we members of the Sophomore Class feel it necessary for us to demand that all men admitted to Princeton be accepted into the social system of the upperclass years as well as the academic life of the University.

 

"Wishing to express ourselves in the most effective way possible, we, the undersigned, do hereby resolve to abstain from joining any eating club unless each Sophomore eligible is given a bid.  In signing this petition, we pledge our honor as gentlemen to adhere to its provisions.  (This petition will be invalid unless 600 names are secured.)”

 

News of the petition produced turmoil at Princeton and among alumni.  By early December 1949, 625 class members had signed up.  The controversy continued and heightened.  Some considered the petition an outrageous threat to the Clubs—and others would eliminate the Clubs altogether.  Bicker time came, and after maximum efforts by the Clubs and the Interclub Committee, the Prince was able to announce on March 9, 1950:  "All Sophs Get Bids.”  We believe that this was the first time "100%” was achieved in a Club Bicker. 

 

The 1952 Class petition was not an attempt to destroy the Clubs.  It was an attempt to make them better.  Unlike many other college social systems, the Clubs were the only dining and social facilities for Princeton juniors and seniors.  The few who were excluded from the Clubs had their meals in Commons with Freshmen and Sophomores, or on their own, and no social facilities. 

 

I believe that the Clubs have been a unique and valuable part of life at Princeton.  They provide larger community groups than sororities and fraternities and a more genial variety of members than the residential colleges with which I am familiar (Yale and Oxford).  I hope that the Clubs will be included in the final plan. 
 

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An Interview with DICK RIORDAN was published in the Los Angeles Times in May, 2010.  The introduction is shown below. The rest of the text will be run when I have time to type it . It is not in a form  that can be copied. -  JJC

Unleashed

RICHARD RIORDAN spent eight years as mayor of Los Angeles, but he didn't start his civic engagement with L.A. when was sworn in, and he didn't end it after he was termed out. Since then he's become part tribal elder, part fun uncle, but just now the City Council isn't sending any love his way. It's pretty irked by Riordan's warnings that the city may have to resort to bankruptcy to save itself .

Riordan's post-mayoral resume includes a short stint as California Secretary of Education - a still public life in the public eye. Personally and through his foundation, the attorney/investor/venture capitalist has given away what he figures is tens of millions of dollars to L.A. causes. I've know Riordan since he first ran for mayor. We get along even though he's a Paul Johnson history kind of guy and I'm a Howard Zinn kind of gal. At 80, he bikes, skis, walks his goldendoodle, Billy, and exhausts the rest of us.

The following press release was released by Sustained Dialogue Campus Network (SDCN) on December 2. The class of 1952  helped to finance SDCN's 10th anniversary meeting earlier this year.
 

We wanted to share good news with friends and members of our Network! Hal Saunders, President and founder of the International Institute for Sustained Dialogue, and Amy Lazarus, SDCN's Executive Director, both received honors this week. Read below to learn more about these awards.

Hal Saunders received the American Academy for Diplomacy's Annenberg Award. The American Academy of Diplomacy and William J. Burns, Under Secretary for Political Affairs, hosted its twenty-first annual awards luncheon on Tuesday, November 30, 2010 in the Benjamin Franklin Room of the U.S. Department of State, where Hal gave the keynote address. Hal received this year’s Annenberg Award for Excellence in Diplomacy, awarded to an individual who has made exemplary contributions to the field of American diplomacy. Past recipients of the award include Secretary of State Colin Powell , UN Secretary General Kofi Annan and Robert Oakley '52


 In a related event of interest to the Class, the Executive Director of the Sustained Dialogue Campus Network, Amy Lazarus, is one of eight winners of the USA Network’s "Characters Unite” Award, which recognizes extraordinary individuals who have made significant efforts to fight prejudice and discrimination while increasing tolerance, respect, and acceptance.   SDCN received support from the Class of '52 for its tenth anniversary celebration earlier this year, and a number of members of the Class responded to the appeal for contributions toward a matching grant contribution to the organization's work in training and supporting dialogues at some 15 colleges following the example of dialogue at Princeton that dates back to 1999.  The support of the SDCN conference is a Class "enduring mark."  


. Learn more about Hal’s award here.

 


Hal's address on accepting the award is printed below.


A PARADIGM FOR DIPLOMACY IN THE 21ST CENTURY

 

Harold H. Saunders

 

American Academy of Diplomacy Awards Luncheon

Benjamin Franklin Room, Department of State

November 30, 2010

 

 

Preface: My purpose in this address is not to preach but to lay out some thoughts for discussion among us designed to crystallize what we have learned from working through a turbulent half-century. You already know the lessons that I will mention. The challenge is to get them right so they can be passed on in a meaningful way to our successors. In that spirit, I proceed while looking forward to a continuing conversation.

 

*                                    *                                    *                                    *                                    *

 

Working for five presidents of the United States and with other world leaders taught me that the conceptual lenses—the paradigm—that they use to interpret events determine how they act.

 

—It made a difference, for instance, in the Arab-Israeli peace process that President Carter and Secretary Vance saw the world through lenses that included a human rights focus that brought the Palestinians to the top of the agenda.

 

—It made a difference that Egyptian President Anwar al-Sadat recognized that the primary obstacle to an Egyptian-Israeli peace could not be removed by negotiations between governments. He flew to Israel because he knew that the main obstacle was the deep-rooted conviction of Israeli citizens that no Arab leader would accept a Jewish state in the Middle East.

 

—And it made a difference that President Reagan and Secretary Haig looked at the world primarily through anti-Communist lenses and pushed the post Camp David talks on Palestinian autonomy to the back burner.

 

The same is true of all of us. We all have such lenses. Our mindset—our paradigm— shapes our interpretation of events around us and our responses. Some may think that talking about paradigms is too academic, but whatever we call it, we all have one, and it affects our decisions and our actions.

 

My message today is that until we change our lenses—until we adopt a new paradigm—we’re not going to have as effective a Foreign Service in our dramatically changing world as we would like.

 

My message is strongly stated to make a point. I’m acutely aware of the practical objections to any message so stated. But I also know that nothing changes unless reasons for change are stated cogently but starkly.

 

Most of us grew up professionally with a mindset shaped by what has been called the "realist paradigm”—leaders of nation states amass economic and military power to pursue objectively defined interests in zero-sum contests of power against other nation states. The focus was states, their governments and all the apparatus that surrounds them.

 

The realist paradigm never worked for me. I suppose it was more comfortable for those working on Cold War issues between two superpowers. But in the Arab-Israeli-Palestinian arena where I worked, the relationships were much more complex. One party was not even a state. As one Israeli friend said, "It’s an intercommunal conflict.”

 

I suspect the realist paradigm never worked for many of you:

 

—Some of you worked in Latin America as citizens outside government brought their  countries out from under military rule. Some of you may have been in Chile during the "vote not” campaign against Pinochet.

 

—Some of you were in Poland during the Solidarity campaigns, or in Prague as people demonstrated in Wenceslas Square. You saw the Berlin Wall come down. Or later, some may have been in Belgrade when Milosevic was toppled.

 

—Some of you lived through the anti-apartheid movement and the transition to democracy in South Africa.

 

All the people armed with power conventionally defined ended up out of power, removed by people presumably without power. In the traditional paradigm, power has been defined as the ability to coerce and control. In our world, power seemed more the ability to change the course of events.

 

We have lived a different picture of the world. We have lived the evolution of a new paradigm. I would say it is a more realistic one. It embraces whole bodies politic—citizens inside and citizens outside government—rather than focusing primarily on states and their governments.

 

The greatest untapped resources for meeting the challenges of the 21st century are the energies and capacities of citizens outside government. The realist paradigm with its focus on states and their institutions leaves them out. Such a paradigm is unrealistic because it does not take advantage of energies and capacities that could change this world. It is immoral because it leaves out most of the world’s people.

 

Our challenge and responsibility is to articulate the paradigm we have learned from experience and "teach it to our children” and grandchildren. We need to be explicit in arguing the need to change our conceptual lenses. We need to be decisive in defining the implications of a paradigm shift for how we prepare the next generation of Foreign Service Officers to be leaders in a different world.

 

Politics—domestic and international—is not always a zero-sum contest over power.

Politics can be a much more complex and creative interaction—not just action and reaction.

 

Politics is a cumulative, multilevel, open-ended process of continuous interaction over time engaging significant clusters of citizens in and out of government building relationships to solve public problems. We need to focus on whole bodies politic. We need to focus not just on the pursuit and exercise of material power but on the peaceful conduct and transformation of destructive relationships into relationships that can produce constructive change.

 

That is my statement of an alternative paradigm. I call it the relational paradigm.

 

This is a much more complex picture than the traditional one of a linear series of actions and reactions devised by government decision-makers and traded between institutional actors such as governments and other influential stakeholders. It is about the processes through which citizens as political actors interact—how they relate. It is a far more inclusive—and therefore realistic—reflection of the potential sources of change. It is also continuously moving with change taking place on many levels and in many quarters simultaneously. Not unlike the human body, many interactive processes are at work in the body politic at the same time.

 

What does this mean in practical terms for the entering Foreign Service Officer? Four basic propositions to start our conversation:

 

First, diplomacy in the 21st century is the constructive conduct of relationships between whole bodies politic not just the representation of one government to another.

 

I have often said to my colleagues and friends in the State Department, "Our job is not to design and conduct policy for the U.S. Government. It’s to design and conduct policy for the United States of America. Thinking that way would turn loose the enormous energy, capacity, compassion, and imagination of this great country.

 

The framework for analysis of relationships between countries must embrace whole bodies politic—the human as well as the institutional dimension of international interactions, citizens outside as well as citizens inside government.

 

The recent Russian outreach to the people of Poland acknowledging responsibility and regret for the massacre of Polish officers in the Katyn Forest has done more to improve that relationship than any act of economic or military policy could have.

 

A senior Russian official is reported to have said privately that until Americans see Russia as a genuine democracy with a rule of law, they will not respect or trust Russia.

 

Why do Asian nations 65 years after the end of World War II continue to demand a Japanese apology for atrocities during the war?

 

Why did President Sadat go to Jerusalem? 

 

Second, since relationship is the unit of analysis, we need to teach a precisely defined concept of relationship. Relationship is a comprehensive human concept embracing five components: identity, interests, power, perceptions, interactions.

 

The concept of relationship is both an analytical and an operational tool.

—It is an analytical tool because one can sort observations of behavior and events under these five headings and from that depict the dynamics of a relationship.

—It is an operational tool because one can get inside each of these components to change it.

Core identities don’t change, but our identities are continuously growing in response to new insights. Our notion of power changes as we learn that we need another’s collaboration to achieve our interests. We can redefine interests as we develop collaborative patterns of interaction. Our perceptions of others change through interaction.

 

Third, the key to relationship is dialogue. Dialogue must supplement traditional diplomatic discourse.  Dialogue is listening deeply and carefully enough to another person to be changed by what one hears. It is a demonstration of respect and openness to a constructive relationship. It enables participants to address the problem behind a problem—often a destructive or dysfunctional relationship that must be changed if the problem it causes is to be resolved.

 

Albert Einstein warned that "a problem is rarely solved by the thinking that caused it.” That is why we must learn to probe the problem behind the problem.

 

There are issues on which citizens outside government presently have more freedom to examine options and their consequences through dialogue than government officials now have through formal negotiation. How to make this resource available to governments on a routine basis is an idea that must be explored urgently and more concretely.

 

The current Dartmouth Conference Task Force on the Russia-U.S. Relationship, for instance, has recommended to the Bilateral Presidential Commission the formation of "nonofficial preventive dialogues” on potential regional conflicts that could bring our countries into confrontation. Citizens not constrained by government positions and with no authority to speak for governments are free to examine contingencies and the possible responses to them in ways that governments cannot without tying their hands. 

 

Fourth, dialogue when sustained systematically can become a process for transforming relationships.

 

A carefully designed process of Sustained Dialogue has been developed and tested through almost three decades in 90 international dialogues. Each year some 1,000 students on college campuses participate in such dialogues. Perhaps a cadre of Foreign Service Officers should experiment with adding this process to their toolkits. Even if they did not, working with the something like the relational paradigm would help them internalize a new way of interacting with the world around them.

 

 

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That is a large agenda. Starting with a new paradigm, mounting such an agenda will require a conscious overhaul of education for diplomacy in the 21st century in the universities as well as at the Foreign Service Institute. Nothing less will do the job.

 

Now let me conclude by trying to connect with what you are feeling. I know that, in this room, I am speaking to men and women who have instinctively and presciently acted in the mode I describe because it is just human common sense. I can imagine you are thinking: "That’s what I spent my career doing.” Some of you may even be thinking: "That’s what Secretary Clinton’s article in the current issue of Foreign Affairs is all about. That’s what we are saying and doing.” I accept that.

 

But IS that what our system—in government and out—is teaching and doing?

 

We are all in some measure creatures of our upbringing—professional as well as personal. It’s not easy to change inbred mindsets. Yet changing our way of looking at the world is critical. Indeed, in my mind any theory of social change must begin with a change in mindset. Are we explicitly internalizing this new paradigm? Does the system enable us to live it?

 

That is the challenge of preparing diplomats—indeed all Americans—to meet and conquer the challenges of the 21st century. And that must be the subject of a continuing conversation among us.