Class Notes for July 16, 2008

(As submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

JAY 52. So read the Pennsylvania license plates of JAY SHERRERD, one of our most distinguished classmates, the most distinguished when his contributions to Princeton and the Class of '52 are counted. About 700 came for his memorial service on April 19, 2008 at the Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, a service which touched on all aspects of Jay's remarkably productive life. There were eulogies from family, friends, a college roommate, a business partner, and a fellow Princeton trustee, as well as beautifully sung musical tributes by Jay's granddaughters, Alexandra Arader '08 and Michelle Arader '10. As moving as the service had been, its conclusion was a hit - a rendition of classic Princeton songs by an ensemble from the University band. Twenty-six classmates and honorary classmates attended, almost all in striped Reunion jackets. Most notable was University President and honorary classmate, SHIRLEY TILGHMAN, who honored Jay by wearing her striped jacket and honored us by sitting in the midst of the '52 contingent near the front of the church.


CLASSMATES/HONORARY CLASSMATES AT SHERRERD MEMORIAL

George Aman Jack Joyce Bill Murdoch
Joe Bolster Dick Kazmaier Mary Murdoch (HC)
Stokes Carrigan Hoby Kreitler George Newlin
John Clutz Rudy Lehnert Geoff Nunes
Jim Davis Don Malehorn Don Oberdorfer
Chuck DeVoe Bob McLean Hal Saunders
Dan Duffield Roger McLean Charlie Schaefer
Al Ellis Eric Merrifield Hank Sherk
George Hambleton Shirley Tilghman (HC)


FIFTY-SIXTH REUNION. The celebration for our Class began midday Friday (May 30) when we received two Alumni Council prizes for our 55th, one for attendance percentage, the other for "innovations" in organizing the reunion. That evening, a crowd of 32, including 20 classmates, was treated to a lavish buffet dinner at the home of MARY and BILL MURDOCH. As a sign of the times, we had all gone home by nine PM. We learned on excellent authority that the younger classes partied until two-thirty AM when the bartenders and musicians called it quits. The next day the P-rade was threatened by a washout when the heavens opened about noon, and the rain fell hard for over an hour. The weather cleared; the P-rade kicked off on schedule; and the rain held off until the graduating seniors brought up the rear. In the intervening three-plus hours, the P-rade was seen by long-time marchers like JOE BOLSTER as one of the largest and most enthusiastic in the past half-century. Our own delegation numbered but a dozen striped jackets. Nonetheless, the Tiger cheers for '52 were repeated all along the route of march from classes in the mid-fifties to the seniors of the Class of 2008 who greeted our tiny contingent with a full-throated roar. A small but memorable off-year reunion.


CLASSMATES/HONORARY CLASSMATE SIGNED INTO 56TH REUNION


George Aman Dick Kazmaier Bill Murdoch
Joe Bolster Rudy Lehnert Mary Murdoch (HC)
Put Brodsky Barry Loper George Newlin
Stokes Carrigan Quincey Lumsden Steve Rogers
Bill Carson Don Malehorn Hal Saunders
John Clutz Bob McLean Charlie Schaefer
Dan Duffield Roger McLean Sam VanCulin
Joe Handelman Lucius Wilmerding

HONORARY CLASSMATES. Four honorary classmates were prominent on Friday of the Reunion weekend. First was Mary Murdoch, who with her husband, Bill, co-chairs of our 55th, accepted for the Class the 1912 Trophy for attendance percentage among older classes, and the Alumni Council award for innovation "that expanded the dimension of Reunions". At the same luncheon meeting of the Alumni Council our honorary classmate, Shirley Tilghman, praised the contributions to alumni education made by Professor CARYL EMERSON, Chair of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, and winner of this year's Alumni Council award for excellence in alumni education. Finally, on Friday afternoon. the Class Executive Committee by unanimous voice vote approved PRISCILLA HILDUM as our newest honorary classmate. Priscilla was recognized for compiling and editing the unique collection of 81 Class wives' stories, Our Lives: A Generation in Transition, a copy of which has secured a place on the shelves of Harvard's vast library system.

REQUIESCANT. BARRY LOPER reports that JOEL STONE died in Concord, Massachusetts on February 2, 2007. The family advised that RUDY OTTERSEN died on April 30, 2008 in Neenah, Wisconsin. PHIL MAY called to say GEORGE GARRETT died in Charlottesville, Virginia on May 26, 2008.



Class Notes for June 11, 2008
(As submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


MINI XXII. A crowd of classmates, wives, associates, and friends (115 in all, including 59 classmates) descended on the bustling university town of Charlottesville, Virginia, April 10-13 for Mini-Reunion XXII. The theme was the evolution of the U.S. Constitution. The group heard from scholars in the field as well as from JIM BAKER, respected on all sides for his skill, integrity, and even-handedness. There was a chance to meet "re-enactors" playing the roles of Thomas Jefferson and Princeton's James Madison, class of 1771. We also toured the homes of these two Presidents, Monticello (Jefferson, of course) and Montpelier (Madison). In a fascinating session, we listened to Presidential tapes, not only the notorious Nixon versions, but also from FDR, Kennedy, and other chief executives. Finally, from a noted analyst on the University of Virginia faculty, we heard predictions for 2008: bright for Dems, cloudy for the GOP. None of this happened without a lot of hard work. Credit for the concept and supervising the details goes to our president, STEVE ROGERS. GEORGE TOWNER kept the books, and JIM WRIGHT, assisted by his wife, Joan, was resident point-of-contact in Charlottesville. Providing important assistance were: Ruthe BATTESTIN, WALTER CRAIGIE, Susan GARRETT, BILL KAPPES, DON OBERDORFER, Kent ROGERS, Carol and HAL SAUNDERS, and PEYTON WEARY.
... AND BEYOND. Our coordinator of mini-reunions, TOM DOSDALL, provided the gathering at Charlottesville with details for the next two minis. Mini XXIII will take place in San Antonio, Texas from April 30 through May 3, 2009. Trail bosses for this Lone Star event are BILL HEALEY and TED McALISTER. Boston will be the site of Mini XXIV June 10-13, 2010. ROGER McLEAN presides over the Bay State organizing committee.


REQUIESCANT. JAY SHERRERD died April 9, 2008 in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. The family of LARRY ANDERSON reported that he died April 20, 2008 at Hilton Head Island, South Carolina.



Class Notes for May 14, 2008
(As Submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly


ORGANIZATIONAL FIX. STEVE ROGERS appointed coordinators for regional Class activities: ROGER McLEAN, New England; CHARLIE SCHAEFER, Philadelphia; GEORGE TOWNER, Washington, D.C.; and ED TIRYAKIAN, Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Steve will gladly accept volunteers in other locations.

HEALTH NOTES - POSITIVE. REINHARD LOOSCH relates that he underwent colon surgery in 2006 from which he has successfully recovered. FRANK SPARROW marked five good years since heart transplant surgery. DAVE BUTLER narrowly avoided kidney failure because of a blood disorder and then underwent surgery to remove a subdural hemotoma (a blood clot pressing against the brain). After all that, Dave says he feels, "Just fine, thanks." DUNC STEPHENS has learned to love his pacemaker. Finally, PUT BRODSKY, M.D., claims to have stayed "reasonably healthy" since our 55th.

FAMILY MATTERS. ART CHRISTENSEN and his wife, Peg, happily celebrated their 50th anniversary last fall. BUD GILLETTE's three sons combine worldwide interests. Bruce is a general manager for Qatar Airlines. Christopher is a TV news producer with AP who works mostly in Latin America. John is a trader specializing in emerging markets with Lazard Freres in New York. Frank Sparrow counts 12 grandchildren of whom the youngest celebrated his first birthday a few months back. JOHN SPRAGUE reports his granddaughter, Whitney, is an All-American swimmer at the University of North Carolina. The likely class champion great-grandfather, MAL CLELAND, now counts seven great~grands

MOVES. GERRY ANDLINGER to Aspen for its beauty and consequent peace of mind. GIL BOGLEY escapes the Michigan winters in Quail Creek, Arizona. FRED MANN's new home in New Zealand is completed, ready for the Manns "to use it to extend our summer, thanks to the opposite seasons". JIM ROCKWELL counts three Tigers in his retirement community near Medford, Oregon. ARNOLD BARNES now calls Sudbury, Massachusetts home. BILL TRULIO migrates with the seasons between Annapolis, Maryland and San Francisco.




Class Notes for April 23, 2008
(As Submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


IN MEMORIAM. ED TIRYAKIAN reports that over 200 friends and family gathered in Chapel Hill, North Carolina on February 2, 2008 to honor BURT WEISS. Classmates on hand included BOB DOHERTY, BOB EBY, BOB JIRANEK, PAUL LINDSAY, BEN SALER, AL SLOAN and Ed Tiryakian

POSTHUMOUS HONOR. Bob Doherty reported that Delaware Gov. Ruth Ann Minner ordered flags at state facilities to be flown at half-staff for three days after LAIRD STABLER's death on February 24. The tribute honored Laird's service in the legislative and executive branches of state government and his exemplary contributions to the Delaware community as a private citizen.

RECOGNITION. More from PORTER HOPKINS, who covers Baltimore and environs for '52 like a space-age vacuum cleaner. His most recent item concerns BILL CAREY, honored in December by the trustees of Gilman School as the "major donor and force behind the extensive renovations of Carey Hall" at the famed Baltimore prep school. Bill's interest here seems to be twofold: first, as a Gilman alumnus; and second, as grandson of a school founder.

BELLES LETTRES. Reports from three classmates of their most recent literary accomplishments. BUD FOULKE saw the culmination of six years work as an editor and contributor with the publication 1ast sprinq of the Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History. NICK CLIFFORD, retired historian who specialized in the Orient, collaborated with his wife, Deborah, also an historian, on The Troubled Roar of the Waters, an examination of how the horrendous 1927 floods in Vermont were reflected in American life in the 1920s. Finally, from BILL BAILLARGEON an announcement that he has been placed in charge of the personal library of the legendary aviation tycoon, William E. Boeing. Not merely a custodian, Bill's responsibilities center on developing "a bibliographical profile" of Boeing. Bill's note concludes that it is "a privilege to have this assignment".





Class Notes for April 2, 2008
(As submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


ALUMNI DAY 2008. "A wintry mix" held down the size of the Alumni Day crowd at the Alumni Association luncheon in Jadwin Gym. Of interest to '52 were the recognition of Anne SHERRERD *87 as Vice Chair of the Alumni Association and honorary classmate PETE CARRILL as mentor and inspiration for John W. Rogers '80, this year's Woodrow Wilson Award winner. At the Service of Remembrance in the Chapel, President STEVE ROGERS represented the Class as we honored 10 classmates who died in 2007 and one not previously honored who died in 2005.

DEATH ON THE NILE. The tomb and mummy of the Pharaoh Tutankhamun, discovered in 1925, have been the source of much of our knowledge of ancient Egypt and, at the same time, of questions about his death. For 80 years, Egyptologists were baffled in attempts to determine what killed the young king. Into the investigation in 2005 stepped BEN HARER, an OB-GYN specialist and past President of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Ben's "other vocation" is Egyptologist, for which he was recognized by the Explorers' Club as a National Fellow in 1992. With these impeccable medical and archaeological credentials, Ben studied CT scans of Tutankhamun's body, noted differences between the king's mummy and those of other royal corpses of the period, and concluded that the young king died of a crushing blow to the chest, most likely from the kick of a chariot horse. Ben reported his findings in the journal Minerva Sept/Oct 2007. When not enjoying retirement in his home in Seattle, Ben, as he has for 26 years, will probably be found working at a Brooklyn Museum "dig" in Egypt.

REQUIESCANT. MIKE CAREY and BOB DOHERTY reported that LAIRD STABLER died February 24, 2008 in Wilmington, Delaware. (Please note that the date of death for RAMSEY BRONK should have read December 30, 2007.)






Class Notes for March 19, 2008
(As submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


COMMUNITY SERVICE. ART CHRISTENSEN advised that DICK PIVIROTTO, in addition to honors received for distinguished service to the University, has been recognized posthumously for distinguished service to the community. Dick, a member and later chairman of its board of directors for three decades, was cited as "instrumental in transforming Greenwich Hospital into a regional healthcare facility". In his honor, the hospital has given Dick's name to its healthy living center.

INNOCENTS ABROAD. Last May, our cavalry troop, veterans of trail rides on six continents, rode along the Atlantic coast in southern Portugal. Our class caballeros shown here: BOB JIRANEK(left) and CHIPS CHESTER.

RARE SOUND. Bill Vanden Heuvel '56 sent a clipping from the Sunbury, Pennsylvania Daily Item about CHARLIE PHELPS. For years, Charlie has served as custodian and performer on a rare John Wind organ. Made in Lancaster County almost two centuries ago, the organ has been housed in the Priestly Memorial Chapel in Northumberland since the eighteen thirties. In addition to caring for this instrument of which only two are known to exist, Charlie performs at a monthly service in the chapel.

REQUIESCAT. PHIL McMASTER reports that RAMSEY BRONK of Oxford, England died December 31, 2007.

In October, ED MASINTER and BILL LONG found that each had signed up (perhaps urged on by their wives) for Signor Giuliano Bugialli's cooking school not far from Florence, Italy. Here we see the two culinary novices, Bill (left) and Ed, tending a pot of polenta.






Class Notes for March 5, 2008
(As submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


REUNION AWARDS. All who attended thought our 55th was fabulous. Now the Alumni Council has validated that opinion. In a letter to STEVE ROGERS, the Council notified us that '52 won two awards, one each for quality and quantity. The first was for "innovation{s) that expanded the dimension of Reunions". Three features of our 55th were cited: provision of a quiet living space at headquarters; the 1952-2002 time capsule; and the book The Women of '52 Tell Their Stories. Our Class also won the 1912 Trophy (in honor of the class that passed their unique Reunion jacket design to us at our 40th) for highest Reunion attendance among classes at least 50 years out. Our numbers last June constituted 29 percent of the Class.

A GOOD DEED REMEMBERED. In Korea a half-century ago, BARNEY McHENRY befriended his artillery battalion's Korean interpreter, Ik Hoo Choi. After returning to the States, Barney arranged for and sponsored Choi's entrance to the U.S., then helped him further his education, culminating in his graduation from Columbia. Choi became an American citizen and lived here until his death last November. Acccording to PORTER HOPKINS, who passed this story along, Barney and Choi remained close friends, often coming to Maryland's Eastern Shore for birdshooting with Porter. Thanks, Barney, for a generous deed. Few of us can match your magnanimity.

FAMILY PROJECT. A letter from JIM DAVIS describing a unique family project is herewith quoted in full: "Jim and Elda Davis, their three children, their children's spouses, and their five grandchildren are showing 26 paintings, all dripped and dribbled in the style of the late Jackson Pollock, in a ”Fami1y Exhibition" in the University of Pennsylvania’s Burrison Gallery." Jim also wrote that if the Secretary did not want to include this gem in Class Notes, he was given leave to "throw it out". No chance of that.






Class Notes for February 13, 2008
(As submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


WANDERLUST. About twice a year it is time to report the travels of our itinerant classmates. Closest to home was DAVE SMITH who left Houston by car in late May, attended our 55th, then returned home the long way via upper New York State, Maine, New York City and Ohio. Highlights in addition to the Reunion: Lois Smith singing with her church choir in Carnegie Hall and a family reunion in Ohio. Gloria and PHIL MAY sailed on a trans-Atlantic cruise to Bermuda, the Canary Islands, Madeira, Portugal, and Spain before landing in the U.K. at Southampton. ARNOLD BARNES traveled to Russia. IRV COHEN was off to China in October after earlier trips to Mexico, western Europe, the Baltic states, and Russia. ED TIRYAKIAN, who is always on the move, most recently returned from Romania and Bulgaria. Kent and STEVE ROGERS spent a week and a half this fall in Armenia. PAUL PRESSLER returned in May from a trip that took him first to Qatar and then Mongolia. Paul figures his list of foreign countries visited is now near 100.

Rev. TED MARTIN in the past five years has traveled for the Campus Crusade for Christ to Mexico, Turkey, Sudan, India, Singapore, Thailand, and Mongolia. BOB STOTT gets around, last year to the Far East, principally Thailand. At an elephant training camp, Bob had a playful encounter with one of the "trainees" which he survived with his sense of humor and body intact. The most exotic locale visited was Tahiti and Polynesia where Murrell and MATT WERTH cruised for eleven days.

REQUIESCANT. The family reported that DONALD A. EDWARDS of New Braunfels, Texas died October 23, 2007. Ed Tiryakian notified us that BURT WEISS died December 9, 2007 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Peggy WAGNER told us that CHAPPlE died in Alexandria, Virginia on December 29, 2007.






Class Notes For January 23, 2008
(As submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


AN ENDURING MARK. DICK PIVIROTTO, one of the wheel-horses of our Class and a major actor on the University scene for decades, died almost exactly one year ago. Now, thanks to the generosity of two generations of the Pivirotto family, Princeton will have a monument to Dick designed to last two centuries. The December 12, 2007 issue of the Alumni Weekly included six pages of photographs showing the gorgeous new Whitman College, and rising above the rest of the complex is Pivirotto-Murley Family Tower. The Murley name is for Bob Murley '72 and his wife, Mimi Pivirotto Murley '76. Bob Murley has already compiled a distinguished record of service to Princeton, capped by his appointment as co-chair of the newly launched Aspire capital gift campaign. The line continues with Dick's granddaughters, Mimi Murley '07 and Megan Murley '10.

OF DISTINCTION. STEVE ROGERS sent along a notice from the Federal Trade Commission that TOM LEARY was scheduled to receive the FTC's Kirkpatrick Award on December 6, 2007. Torn served eight years as an FTC Commissioner, and the award recognized his distinguished service in that office. DAVE SMITH provided a news item from Houston stating the Louisiana College in Pineville, Louisiana announced establishment of the Judge PAUL PRESSLER College of Law. A subsequent note from Paul said that he was "quite excited about the honor". Notes from JOE BOLSTER and ROGER McLEAN pointed out that on November I, 2007, JOE HANDELMAN became a member of the New Rochelle (NY) Sports Hall of Fame and will be honored with a plaque at City Hall. Joe's citation records his superior academic achievements from high school through business school at NYU. As for running, Joe began in elementary school and never stopped, competing in an estimated 1200 races including both the Boston and New York City Marathons, altogether running some 66,000 miles. Scholar, stalwart worker for the Class, and indefatigable competitor, proof of which is in this photo of the honoree (See the PAW for photo). Another senior athlete, CHUCK DEVOE, writes that he paired with his former Princeton teammate, Gerry Thomas '51, to take the National Clay Court 75 doubles in Washington, D.C. last September. Finally, Dave Smith from Houston again, reports that JIM BAKER will have to make space in his trophy room for yet another award. The Houston Chronicle named our classmate the Ultimate Dinner Partner - Male, saying, "He just can't help being the most interesting guy at the table."


HARVARD GAME. Watching the Tigers being thumped by Harvard probably wasn't much fun. However, Roger McLean reports that he and nine other classmates had an enjoyable lunch before the game at Harvard Stadium. On hand, along with wives and_various family members, were REED HARTEL, BRUCE JOHNSON, Roger McLean, GEOFF NUNES, KIRK PARRISH, LEIGH SMITH, LEFTY THOMAS, GEOF TICKNER, BOB WARREN, and ALLEN WEST. Geof Tickner may seem geographically out of place in this group, the rest of whom would need a couple of hours at most to drive to the game from home. Geof, who lives on Hilton Head Island in South Carolina, claims a daughter in the Boston 'burbs, thereby leveraging a visit to the grandchildren into a place at the table and a seat in the stadium.

SAVE THE DATES. Two of them to be exact. First comes the mid-winter Alumni Day on February 23. Second is Mini-Reunion XXII in Charlottesville, Virginia, April 10-13. Details are forthcoming via snail and E-mail.
Dan Duffield

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Class Notes For December 12, 2007
(As submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


POST-RETIREMENT. Reports from classmates all over the map address retirement, semi-retirement, or plans to retire soon. BANKS ANDERSON is now professor emeritus at Duke's medical school ending the active connection of his family and the school that began early in the last century. IRV COHEN has cut back his psychotherapy practice in preparation for full-time retirement by the end of 2007. BOB (ROBERT A.) JOHNSTON says life after leaving his medical practice involves "golf, bridge, (and) travel, mainly to visit children and grandchildren". BEN MOORE claims semi-retirement means fishing and hunting plus enjoying 18 grandchildren. BOB STOTT, a ceaseless traveler, has taken up bridge "to keep the gray matter alive".BILL TRULIO plans to retire within a year, "for the third time", from his architectural practice.


LONG-TERM PARTNERS. Marion and BILL GOUGH celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary with a luxurious cruise to the Mexican Riviera. We knew BOB HELLWARTH was still on the faculty of the University of Southern California (electrical engineering and physics). He reports now that his wife Theresia deVroom, is professor of English at Loyola-Marymount University in Los Angeles. Third member of their family is their son, William, "a full-time teenager". JOHN WEBER did not attend our 55th, and with good reason. His wife, Sally, was celebrating her 50th reunion at Mary Washington College in

Fredericksburg, Virginia, the first class reunion she had ever attended.



TIGER CUBS. BOB DOHERTY's oldest grandchild, Matt, is a new Princetonian, class of 2011. DOM TELESCO is so proud of his granddaughter, Chloe Wohlforth, that he reminds us that she graduated from Princeton two days after our 55th.



WEB GEM CORRECTION. The keepers of the Class Web site, with uncommon patience and tolerance, have reminded the Secretary, a computer dunce, that the correct '52 Web site address should read: www.princeton52.org.
Dan Duffield


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Class Notes for November 21, 2007
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)
KUDOS. Brown University reported that CHUCK CARPENTER received the nation's top award in academic internal medicine, the Robert H. Williams Award. According to the Brown press release, the award is presented annually to a "distinguished physician who has demonstrated outstanding leadership (in) internal medicine". Chuck's colleagues describe him as: "an incredibly generous mentor", and a "humanist who really cares about people". In addition to service at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland and Johns Hopkins, Chuck worked in Calcutta, India for two years developing techniques to ease the suffering of cholera patients. For the last twenty years at Brown his work has focused on combating HIV in low-income neighborhoods and the Rhode Island prison system as well as in HIV/AIDS-ravaged areas in Africa. None of this is news to classmates who were present at our 50th Reunion when Chuck received a Distinguished Classmate Award.
LEGACY. PORTER HOPKINS reported that DICK MACKSEY donated his manuscript and book collection to Johns Hopkins where he was a longtime faculty member. The collection of over 70,000 items valued at several million dollars will be a gold mine for future scholars.

INTREPID BIRDMEN. WARREN BRUCE and GORDON LAMB reported separately that each has received the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award in recognition of over 50 years of flying in which our classmates have kept the number of safe landings equal to the number of take-offs. Both are graduates of U.S. Navy flight training and have been flying ever since. These days Warren does search and rescue work off the North Carolina coast. Gordon does stunt and formation flying over Long Island as a member of the "New York Sky-Typers".

ANOTHER WEB GEM. Class President STEVE ROGERS asks that E-mail devotees make sure that their current E-mail addresses are correctly listed in the website Directory at www.princeton52.org.

Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for November 7, 2007
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)
GREEN STAR. The Open Space Institute, a New York-based environmental protection group, awarded BARNEY McHENRY its 2007 Land Conservation Award. The organization cited Barney for four decades of work to protect "Hudson River Valley landscapes, heritage and culture". The award was presented at the Institute's annual luncheon in New York City on April 26, 2007. JIM BAKER, Barney's Princeton roommate, was keynote speaker. At the same event, the creation of the Barnabas McHenry Hudson Valley Awards was announced, and the 2007 recipients named: three college and postgraduate students committed to careers in conservation and historic preservation in the Hudson River Valley. Classmates supporting the McHenry Awards include: Jim Baker, DAVE PATON, CONNIE SIDAMON-ERISTOFF, and BOB WORTH.
VINTNER EXTRAORDINAIRE. Luring BILL SEAVEY from his lovely home and prosperous winery in California's lush Napa Valley last May, the Metropolitan Club of Washington, D.C. presented Bill as host of "a tasting of his award-winning cabernets and merlots". In its promotion, the club noted that a prominent wine critic had named Bill a "'rising star’ in U.S. wine-making". In his report, Bill pointed out that Jim Baker had been the speaker at a Metropolitan Club luncheon a few days earlier to discuss his new memoir and the work of the Iraq Study Group, which he co-chaired. The Class can take pride in our two distinguished classmates headlining separate events at one of Washington's most prestigious private clubs.
REQUIESCANT-CORRECTED. The normally flawless Class Notes editorial operation threw a shoe in publishing the September 26 issue. The date of BOB ARNSTEIN's death was given as May 9, 2007. It should have read April 30, 2007. JACK McCUNE's death was not recorded. He died May 9, 2007 in Washington, D.C. (For a report on the impressive memorial service for Jack, see the October 10 issue.) The information on FRANK PEARD and ROBERT SMITH was correct.
Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for October 24, 2007
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

STILL GOING. The Class of '52 versions of the Energizer Bunny are CHUCK DEVOE and JOE HANDELMAN. As reported by GIL BOGLEY and ROGER McLEAN, Chuck took the 75 singles title and was a doubles finalist at the US Tennis Association Hard Court (age group) Championships in May. A month earlier, Joe was the oldest finisher in the annual Ludington 50 km road race in Carmel, New York. Joe grinds out the 31% miles every year, finishing not far behind runners ten years younger.

LITERARY NOTES. We have heard from three Class authors. BUD FOULKE and his wife, Patty, are finishing a trilogy of visitors' guides to Colonial and Revolutionary America. The first volume covering New England was published last year. The second volume dealing with the Mid-Atlantic colonies will be out this year and the final volume in 2008. In an unusual project close to home, GEORGE NEWLIN has been selected by Princeton and the Princeton University Press to compile a revised Princeton Companion. The original, published in 1978, was a collection of articles about Princeton and all things Princetonian. The new version, drawing on George's considerable skills as researcher and compiler, will be sponsored by our Class and published in 2012, coinciding with our 60th Reunion. Finally, thanks to PHIL MAY, a marvelous DVD about the life and work of GEORGE GARRETT was distributed at our 55th. Phil writes that he can provide a copy to any classmate who did not get one in June. His address/telephone: 4401 Lakeside Drive #1002, Jacksonville,PL 32210; (904)389-6108.
YALE GAME. The Yale game this year is at Princeton Stadium on November 10. As usual, there will be a pre-game picnic lunch in Jadwin Gym. A great opportunity to see classmates and support the team.
Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for October 10, 2007
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

ANNUAL GIVING '07. AG boss DON MALEHORN reported the success of our 55th Reunion campaign. The Class raised $2,250,181, an all-time record for 55th reunion classes, pushing our AG total to $24,396,495, the current record for donations since graduation by a single class. Our 80.3% participation tied that of '57 for highest among post-WWII classes. Don was quick to point out that '52 does well every year because of the efforts of some four dozen classmates led by the team of JOE BOLSTER, JOHN EMERY, and JAY SHERRERD.

A TRIBUTE. CHIPS CHESTER, HARRY EMLET, COKE FLORANCE, BOB JIRANEK, BARRY LOPER, and GEORGE TOWNER all attended JACK McCUNE's funeral on May 16, 2007 at Washington's National Cathedral. Jack for 29 years taught at St. Albans School in Washington. Quiet, unassuming, and a gentleman to his fingertips, Jack was revered as a teacher, counselor and mentor. To honor him, over a thousand turned out, filling the nave of the cavernous cathedral and large parts of the side aisles. Chips estimated that Jack drew a bigger crowd than President Reagan's memorial service. Even more impressive were the eulogies by some of Washington's foremost citizens, testimony to the lives Jack influenced by his intellect and concern for others. Bob Jiranek wrote: "The Class of '52 has lost a quietly towering figure."

HARVARD GAME. The Tigers and Cantabs tangle October 20, 2007 at Harvard Stadium. ROGER McLEAN writes that there will be a '52 table in the Tiger Tent next to the stadium. Come early, meet classmates, and fortify yourself for the rigors of game with genuine New England clam chowder.

WEB GEMS. President STEVE ROGERS announced that the new address for the Class web site is www. princeton52.org . Be sure Steve or VP JOHN CLUTZ has your correct E-mail address.

Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for September 26, 2007
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

Some loose ends that space limitations pushed out of the Reunion Class Note.

RELIEVING THE WATCH. An important moment in every major Reunion is the changeover in the elected leadership of the Class. At the luncheon on Friday, June 1 our former

Vice President, STEVE ROGERS, took over from HAL SAUNDERS as our new President. Passing the Nassau Hall bell clapper appropriated in September 1948 to the new President (on the left) symbolized the change. The incoming Vice President is JOHN CLUTZ who earned a Distinguished Classmate Award for his 15 years of service as Class Treasurer. His successor as our CFO is RUDY LEHNERT, a rookie Class officer. Rounding out the group of elected officers is your Secretary who reenlisted and was approved by the Class for a third term.

ERRATA. During his tenure the Secretary has labored to spell classmates' names correctly. After two error-free terms, the 55th Reunion Class Note was a disaster with four name errors. Mea culpa and apologies to the following: to QUINCEY LUMSDEN for overlooking the "E" in his first name; to Nancy KEGERREIS for overlooking the "E" in her last name; to Priscilla HILDUM for calling her Patricia; and to Latie - not Katie - McLEAN.

REQUIESCANT. The family advised that BOB ARNSTEIN of Bainbridge Island, Washington died on April 30, 2007. BARRY LOPER reported that JACK McCUNE died on May 9, 2007 in Washington. DC. DIZ GILLESPIE sent word that FRANK PEARD died in Boston on May 25, 2007. The Class learned that ROBERT SMITH of Phoenixville, Pennsylvania died on June 28, 2007.
Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for July 18, 2007
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

OUR GLORIOUS 55TH. Our Class contingent numbered over 330, led by 150 Classmates, a record for a 55th Reunion, and 13 Class Associates with a good crowd of wives, other family and friends. The weather held up, save for a little thunder and lightning Friday night, and the event was well worth the 55-year wait.

HEART AND SOUL. A successful Reunion is all about people. It begins with planners who make sure everything works right. Once again, MARY and BILL MURDOCH were our trail bosses, preparing for and running the show. BRUCE COE handled housing. Barbara COE planned the headquarters set-up, including recruiting and training the matchless student staff. RUDY LEHNERT was transportation captain. PUT BRODSKY helped plan activities at the headquarters, and with HOBY KREITLER, helped JOE BOLSTER set up our part of the P-rade. JOHN EMERY and BARRY LOPER concentrated on attendance with Annette MERLE-SMITH working to bring in Class Associates. LEIGH SMITH did all our artwork including the dancing '52 tigers who have embellished all our Reunion literature. JOHN CLUTZ, the budget guru, worked late hours to assure we broke even.

FORUMS, A CAPSULE, AND TOURS. Friday's events featured the '52 Forums, discussions about the impact of higher education on our lives. Moderator HAL SAUNDERS teamed up with ROGER BERLIND, WALT CRAIGIE, TOM LEARY, QUINCEY LUMSDEN, JOHN PEAK, DAVE SMITH, and GEORGE STEVENS. Later, moderator PHYLLIS OAKLEY's panel included Stephanie ABBOTT, Ellen AMAN, Patty CLUTZ, Nancy KEGERREIS, Jean LOPER, and Latie McLEAN. At lunch, the '52 Time Capsule, conceived and implemented by ED TIRYAKIAN, was turned over to the University Archivist to hold until the 50th Reunion of our grandchild Class of 2002. After lunch, Annette Merle-Smith put on her docent's hat and conducted a tour of the University Art Museum.

REMEMBRANCE AND AWARDS. At Saturday's Memorial Service, Revs. SAM VAN CULIN and JIM EVANS presided with Hal Saunders serving as Lector. Readers of the names on the '52 roll of honor were Priscilla HILDUM, ROGER McLEAN, Annette Merle-Smith, GEOFF NUNES, PAUL PIRET, and Hal Saunders. Choral music, as it has been since 1992, was provided by our Class Choir, augmented by women from the University Chapel Choir. Conducted by Margaret EVANS, the choir consisted of GEORGE AMAN, John Clutz, TOM DAUBERT, Jim Evans, Margo FISH, CHARLIE HARPER, JOHN HELM, BRUCE JOHNSON, Sally KREITLER, COLIN McANENY, Jeanne and BRUCE MACOMBER, JIM MELCHERT, POSS PARHAM supported by progeny Kaya and Greg, CHARLIE SHRIVER, Lois and DAVE SMITH, PAUL TROUTMAN, Sam Van Culin, TOM VINCENT, and ALLEN WEST.

Saturday evening, after the incomparable P-rade, was time to assess classmates' awards. Outside the Class, the Princeton Varsity Club presented DICK KAZMAIER its Citizen Athlete Award for 2007. The Friends of Princeton Track gave the Larry Ellis Alumni Award to Joe Bolster. John Emery received the Alumni Council Award for service to Princeton. At our headquarters, we applauded 11 recipients of Distinguished Classmate Awards: well-known agronomist RANDY BARKER; the founder of STRIVE, SAM HARTWELL; "a role model for our Class, for Princeton and for the nation", Dick Kazmaier; and ace student recruiter TED McALISTER. Honored for service to Princeton and '52 were John Clutz, DAN DUFFIELD, Barry Loper, DON MALEHORN, Roger McLean, Mary Murdoch, and Poss Parham. These awards will be the last of the Distingished Classmate citations.
Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for May 9, 2007
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

REUNIONS, MAJOR & MINOR. It's not too late to get on board for our 55th Reunion. We now have 142 classmates returning, along with eight associates (widows of deceased classmates) and, as usual, a crowd of wives, children, other family members, and companions. Looking forward to the off-year mini-reunions, our schedule for the next three years is: 2008 in Charlottesville, Virginia; 2009 in San Antonio; and 2010 in Boston.

FUTURE GENERATIONS. The odds are very short that a conversation with any one in his fifty-fifth year after graduation will soon turn to grandchildren. Notes from classmates follow the same pattern. Dan Baker reports the arrival of two new grandchildren in one week last fall. He has them pegged for the Class of 2028, the year of our 76th Reunion. John Birkelund says his oldest grandson is bound for Harvard. With eight younger grandchildren, John speculates that at least one could be a future Princetonian. Dave Freeman writes he is looking forward a few years until his grandchildren put on their "stripes" - presumably Tiger stripes. Jay Sherrerd advised that his second granddaughter, Class of 2010, is a candidate for Princeton's top-ranked women's rowing program. And Dom Telesco tells us with pride that his granddaughter, Chloe Wohlforth, whose dad was lost at the World Trade Center on 9/11, will pick up her Princeton degree in June.

TALENTED LADIES. Two classmates reported that their daughters are recent authors. Holt published The Dressmaker, a first novel by John Birkelund's daughter, Elizabeth Oberbeck. Porter Hopkins' oldest daughter, Alix, in conjunction with The Trust for Public Land, brought out Groundswell, an account of six successful public-private conservation projects.


Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for April 18 , 2007
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

ALUMNI DAY. Benign weather on Alumni Day, February 24, encouraged a turnout of about 1500 alumni. Our activities began with an Executive Committee meeting Friday after which about three dozen adjourned for dinner at Windrows, a retirement community outside Princeton, the new home of our hosts, Bill and Mary Murdoch. Guest of honor was our newest honorary classmate, Janet Dickerson, shown here flanked by Class President Hal Saunders (left) and Vice-President Steve Rogers (right). [The photo is on the Home Page.] After dinner, Janet, University Vice-President for Campus Life, gave a brief talk about today's Princeton students. On Saturday, the '52 delegation of 30-plus filled three tables at the Alumni Day luncheon in Jadwin Gym. We were happy to see two Class "kids" cited in the program for contributions to the University. Bob Doherty's son, Kelly '81, helped lead his class in raising well over five million dollars in its 25th reunion Annual Giving campaign. Jay Sherrerd's daughter, Anne *87, is Chair of the Graduate Alumni Relations Committee of the Alumni Council. After lunch and the awards ceremony, we went to the University Chapel for the Service of Remembrance. This year 23 deceased classmates were honored. George Aman ably represented us in the procession of classes which lost members during 2006.

ELECTION NOTICE. President Saunders announced the day before Alumni Day the single slate of nominees to serve as Class officers from our 55th to our 60th Reunion. Nominated are: for President, Steve Rogers; for Vice-President, John Clutz; for Secretary, Dan Duffield; and for Treasurer, Rudy Lehnert.

Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for April 4 , 2007
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

HONORS. Thanks to Jerry Canter, we have learned that Bill Carey has been a major donor to Johns Hopkins University in his native city of Baltimore. As a result of Bill's generosity, Johns Hopkins recently established the Carey Business School. As a metter of record, Bill was with us on campus for two years before moving on to Penn's Wharton School for his baccalaureate degree. Nevertheless, he has never missed a class dues payment, has been a generous supporter of Annual Giving, and is a frequent "re-uner", most recently at our 50th.

ARTISTS AT WORK. Classmates continue to make contributions to our cultural heritage. In the case of Jack Ball, it is documentary films produced for an interesting list of clients. Completed last fall was a film for the U.S. Navy. Moving on from there, Jack began work in January on a film for the Vatican, a sequel to an earlier production, In the Steps of Peter. Denizens of Cape Cod know full well that Hyannis Port will never be confused with California's Napa Valley as a center of American viniculture. On the other hand, it is Bruce Johnson's home town, and he is co-author with Christine Ansbacher of Secrets from the Wine Diva. Bruce writes that it is "in book stores everywhere".

RENEWAL. From Mitch Mills comes the happy news that he has remarried. His first wife, Betty, died from Parkinson's disease in 2002. Three years later, Mitch married Sabyna Sterrett whose previous husband also had been a victim of Parkinson's. The couple live in the retirement community of Greenspring in the Washington, D.C. suburb of Springfield, Virginia.

Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for March 21 , 2007
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

CLASS HONORS. The Alumni Council advised that '52 has won the 1898 Trophy and the 1928 Trophy for class gatherings during the year ending June 2006. The 1898 award goes to the class with the highest percentage of members attending any gathering other than Reunions. The 1928 prize is for the largest number attending a class gathering outside Princeton. We had 80 classmates (13.75 percent of the class) at Mini XXI in San Francisco. The Class now has won these two awards twice in the 2002-2007 quinquennium; the other occasion, Mini XVIII in Washington, B.C. in May, 2003.

CLOSE CALL. Two classmates started out from Princeton to attend Dick Pivirotto's funeral but never completed the journey. Thereby hangs a tale. Barbara and Bruce Coe and Bill Murdoch were on the upper reaches of the Jersey Turnpike en route to the funeral. Bruce was at the wheel, Barbara beside him, and Bill in the back seat. Without warning, a large passenger van passed them on the right and then swerved in front of them. The impact was severe enough to activate all the airbags and later cause the car to be declared a total loss. Nonetheless, injuries to the occupants were minor cuts and scrapes. Bill attributed their good fortune to two factors: Bruce's quick reaction to steer the car away from the van, avoiding what would have been a head-on collision; and the tank-like sturdiness of Volvo sedans. The car was a mess, but the occupants walked away.

WHERE CREDIT IS DUE. Space limitations precluded earlier acknowlegement of Joe Bolster's assistance in covering Dick Pivirotto's funeral. Joe filed a detailed report on which 90 percent of the account in Class Notes (March 7) was based. Our thanks, as always

Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for March 7 , 2007
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

GOING OUT A WINNER. The class learned from John Emery that Dick Pivirotto died January 8, 2007 in Greenwich, Connecticut. On Friday, January 12, a reception followed by a funeral eucharist was held at Christ Church in Greenwich. More than 700 mourners filled the church. The Princeton delegation was headed by senior administration officials and former trustees. Classmates on hand included Roger Berlind, Joe Bolster, Brantz Bryan, Joe Handelman, Chuch Hemminger, Bruce Johnson, Dick Kazmaier, Tom Knight, Hoby Kreitler, Don Malehorn, John McGillicuddy, Roger McLean, John McShane, Hal Saunders, Jay Sherrerd, and George Stevens.

The two-hour service featured the 23rd Psalm, the singing of Amazing Grace, and a reflection about Dick's life eloquently delivered by his son, Rick '77. As the service went on and for the next two days, a University flag flew at half-mast over the tower of East Pyne Hall, a customary tribute to distinguished members of the University community. At the request of Dick and his family, the Class of 1952 headed the list of honorary pallbearers, a salute to all of us from a staunch member of the class.

Dick's strong attachment to his classmates was never expressed with more feeling than in a note last fall. Aware that he was seriously ill, he wrote: "The battle is far from over, but knowing that an army of '52 has joined the fight, I feel emboldened and strengthened. Thank you, one and all."

REQUIESCANT. Hale Bradt reported that Bob Chalmers died December 24, 2006 in Rancho Palos Verdes, California. From Phil May we learned that Gil Stockton died December 28, 2006 in Jacksonville, Florida.

Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for February 14, 2007
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

AT HIGHER ALTITUDES. Last June, Roger Berlind picked up his fourteenth Tony award. Three months later, he sent a note with his Class dues payment saying - I'm not making this up - "I wish I had some news. I keep doing the same thing, putting on plays and musicals." Turns out his current endeavor is a "backstage murder mystery musical comedy" which Roger assures us is "very funny". Despite his surpassing self-effacement, Roger may well be called on stage next June to pick up another Tony.

Now a mediator, Charlie Renfrew has been engaged by the states of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia to help iron out an old water rights dispute. As complex as such issues can be, this one becomes even trickier when one contemplates the names of the subject watercourses. Try saying Appalachicola, Chattahoochie, and Tallapoosa ten times as fast as you can. Even so, Charlie is pleased by the good will among the parties and the progress made thus far.

FAREWELL TO AN OLD FRIEND. Elliot Forbes, long-time conductor of the Harvard Glee Club, directed our Freshman Glee Club and, in our senior year, the University Glee Club before moving on to Harvard. Classmates from the Glee Club had stayed in touch ever since, most recently a few years ago when Stokes Carrigan visited him in Cambridge. A note from Al West advised that Elliot Forbes died last winter. Al attended a packed memorial service on February 25, 2006 celebrating Elliot's "talent, kindness, and enthusiasm for music and people".

REQUIESCANT. From Lucius Wilmerding, the Class learned that Preben Scheutz of Fredensborg, Denmark died on November 18, 2006. Lefty Thomas called to report that Buzz Berckmans died November 25, 2006 in Coconut Grove, Florida.

Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for January 24, 2007
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

WELL DONE. Our classmates' recent accomplishments prove once again that '52 is making its mark. Cliff Barr still plays squash at the national championship level in his age group, winning it all in 2005 and reaching the finals this year. John Birkelund joined the board of directors of the world-renowned Frick Collection. Our honorary classmate, Mary Murdoch, received the Alumnae Board Award from her alma mater, Wheaton College in Norton, Massachusetts. Robert ter Horst, a modern languages scholar, has taught at five universities, most recently the University of Rochester. He writes that he delivered the 2006 Fordham Lecture on Cervantes, enlightening his audience on "Cervantes' secular scripture". Fred Mann reports that he was elected to the Medical Advertising Hall of Fame. Our Valedictorian, Bob Hellwarth, is reputed to have received only first group marks ("ones") during our undergraduate years, decades before grade inflation. For the past 25 years he has been Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics at U.S.C. Now comes word from Roy Lawrence

WANDERLUST. Classmate tourists were on the road or the high seas, often with the same destinations. The spectacular scenery of the Dalmatian coast drew Miriam and Bill Carson who joined a Princeton group viewing the historic coastline from a sailing ship. Bill said the star of the show was our honorary classmate, Caryl Emerson, who gave lectures on the history of the area. Bob Stott traveled to Dalmatia as well when he wasn't "dodging hurricanes" in his Florida home. And Chappie Wagner, despite undergoing pulmonary rehab, and taking oxygen 24 hours a day, also toured the Mediterranean. His tour group calls itself the "sea puffers". Chappie says it's the "trips that keep us going and 'above ground'".

America's largest state, Alaska, drew a crowd. Jay Sherrerd took his whole family - eleven in all, covering three generations, ages eight to 76 - on an Alumni College cruise to Alaska's awesome southern coast. En route to and from, Jay took time to visit Kitty and Eric Merrifield and Barbara and Jim Crutcher in Seattle. Sandy Zabriskie served as travel guide for a trip to central Alaska. His group included Ray Baldwin, Dave Kass and their wives. When not visiting Alaska, Ray made a 400-mile bike tour of Montana and Alberta. Relieved that he finished the journey without a fall, he was inspired by the sight of "purple mountain majesties". For his part, Sandy left Alaska behind to take his family - all 23 of them - on an ecology cruise along the Costa Rican coast.

Farther afield, the indefatigable Ed Tiryakian stopped off in Seoul, Korea en route to Beijing. Korea today is a far cry from the war-torn country many of us saw over 50 years ago. Ed says the country today is "dynamic", "urban", and "industrialized" with Asia's largest international airport and, soon to be completed, the world's tallest office building at 120 storeys. Farthermost from home, in the world's most relaxed and scenic environment, was Matt Werth who took an 80th birthday cruise to Polynesia. From his description of the luxuries of the cruise ship and the beauty of the islands, it is a wonder that Matt was persuaded to leave paradise.

REQUIESCAT. From a Princeton friend, the Class learned that Kim Sparks died October 30, 2006 in Cornwall, Vermont. that Bob has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Elected at the same time was some fellow from Arkansas named Clinton, William J. Bob clearly is in the big leagues.

Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for December 13, 2006
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

CULTURE SHOCK. Among the highlights of the San Francisco mini-reunion was Saturday lunch at the Yank Sing restaurant. Here in Phil May's photograph [in the print edition], we see Bob Jiranek trying to make chopsticks behave as an amused Nancy Jiranek looks on.

PATERNAL PRIDE. Two classmates are justifiably proud of their sons. After three years as Director of the Congressional Budget Office, Jim Eakin's son, Douglas, took the Paul Volcker Chair at the Council on Foreign Relations and also serves as Director of its Center for Geoeconomic Studies. Former Marine lieutenant and Korean vet, Larry Anderson, has two sons in the Army. Ned, a major and chaplain, is scheduled to return to Afghanistan for his second tour there. Toby, a captain, is finishing a second tour in Iraq.

"GAUCHOS" RIDE. Since the untimely death of Art Collins, our Class cavalry troop now consists of Chips Chester and Bob Jiranek. Their most recent destination, the Uruguay pampas. First, while Chips lounged around Montevideo, Bob wallowed in rain and mud trying to catch the elusive Dorado trout. In three drenched days he managed to land one large fish. Then the two journeyed to the Uruguayan version of the open range where they rode over two hundred miles in six days from three different estancias (ranches).

REQUIESCANT. The family reported that Ray Lanflisi of San Diego, California died September 12, 2006. Bill Ragland of Dallas Texas died September 19, 2006. From John Emery we learned that Harry Barbee died October 12, 2006 in Red Bank, New Jersey.

Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for November 22, 2006
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

REFLECTIONS. We get occasional messages from classmates reporting smooth sailing and enjoying the voyage. Gil Bogley this year celebrates "75 years of a good life, 50 years of a happy marriage, the blessings of good health, and seven perfect grandchildren". Al Gilgen still lives in Cedar Falls, Iowa five years after retiring from the faculty of the University of Northern Iowa. His evocative message to the Class: "Life proceeds apace! Light meals, household chores, feed the birds, flush out the bird bath, trim the bushes, mow the lawn, put up a bat house (sic), work on book manuscript (his seventh), sit in doctors' offices, watch CNBC and C-Span, visit my son's antique store, play Scrabble with wife, Carol, get up twice in the night, and turn 75". A post script mentioned attending an occasional concert. No question. Al has a surefire formula for graceful aging.

STILL ACTIVE. Put Brodsky retired from his medical practice and moved into a condo in Rumson, New Jersey. He was persuaded to become president of the condo association, a position he calls "a new life experience". Arnold Barnes, fully retired from the Air Force Research Laboratory, Hanscom Air Force Base, is now a member of the Weston (Massachusetts) Council on Aging. Bruce Berckmans received "a new and interesting security and investigative services assignment" on his 75th birthday. George Lambrakis is still in charge of the International Relations and Diplomacy Program in the London branch of Schiller International University. Finally, Wim van Eekelen chairs the European movement in the Netherlands. Both he and Bruce promise to be at our 55th.

REQUIESCAT. The Class has learned that Gren Garside died September 22, 2006 in Norfolk, Connecticut.

Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for November 8, 2006

A NEW MARK FOR ’52. April 8, 2006 — a good day for Princeton, the track and field program, and the class — saw the formal unveiling of the Class of 1952 scoreboard for indoor track and field in Jadwin Gym. As large as the floor space of a medium-sized living room, the board electronically projects event results and team scores so that they are visible across the gym’s main floor. On hand for the dedication were Director of Athletics Gary Walters ’57, men’s and women’s track coaches Fred Samara and Peter Farrell, class president Hal Saunders, and the three donors, Joe Bolster, Joe Handelman, and Jay Sherrerd.
Our four classmates posed after the ceremony with the new scoreboard visible in the background. Pictured (l-r) are: Sherrerd, Bolster, Handelman, and Saunders.

NOT ON THE SHELF. Three classmates formally retired but are still active. Jim Armstrong turned over his practice in Kalispell, Mont., to son Jamie ’86, but continues part-time work in a local Planned Parenthood clinic. Banks Armstrong kept his office at the Duke U. hospital, but, as of this summer, does not see patients. His new “non-schedule” leaves time for travel. Also at Duke, Ed Tiryakian became professor of sociology emeritus a year ago. He still teaches a course each semester, keeps up his research, and travels enough to pile up plenty of frequent flier miles.

Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for October 25, 2006
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

WOMEN OF '52. Some achievements of our better halves. Ruth Kahn wrote an eloquent note thanking the Class for its gift of books to the Firestone Library in memory of Don. A similar gift honors every deceased classmate, but Ruth's letter made this one special. Jane Dean, following George's example, ran the 50th reunion of the Wellesley College class of 1956. In recognition of her success, the class elected Jane president. John Schmidt's wife, Sue, took to the outdoors in her early forties. Since then, she has: climbed Mt. Everest, bicycled across China, hiked over the Sahara, and skied to the North Pole. Closer to home in York, Pennsylvania, she is a triathlete, winning in her age group despite dealing with lymphoma, now in remission, and arthritis. Finally, right here in Princeton, Tink Bolster also took to the outdoors after raising 14 children. A dedicated triathlete, she has placed high in her age group. She swims laps before dawn at the DeNunzio Pool, so early that the University gave her a key to the pool.

MAKING AN EXCEPTION. Carole and Dave Kass met over a half-century ago at Prospect Club. Later, the club was demolished and replaced by the building housing the Center for Jewish Life. Dave and Carole wanted to celebrate their fiftieth wedding anniversary at the place where they met, albeit in a different building, but the University prohibits private parties in campus facilities. It took some doing, but Dave and Carole got a special dispensation and on June 17, 2006 greeted relatives and friends for their anniversary gathering on the spot where they met. Former roommate Don Oberdorfer was on hand and sent in this account.

Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for October 11, 2006
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)
HONORS. In recognition of their singular accomplishments, five classmates were in the spotlight at different times earlier this year. In June, Roger Berlind picked up another Tony award, his fourteenth, for the American production of the British play History Boys. No other Broadway producer in the past half-century can match Roger's array of Tonys. In May, George Garrett received the Carole Weinstein Poetry Prize, an award that recognizes George's talent and also puts $10,000 in his bank account. At the same time, George's most recent book, Empty Bed Blues, hit the street. The reviewer for the Los Angeles Times cited George's adherence "to the old Southern front-porch storytelling tradition that nourished William Faulkner". In April, George Gowen, who served nearly four decades as General Counsel of the U.S. Tennis Association, was inducted into the Eastern Tennis Hall of Fame. Among his predecessors accorded this honor were tennis greats Don Budge, Arthur Ashe, and John McEnroe, as well as Princeton's Herb FitzGibbon '64 and Marjory Gengler Smith '73. In May, the Katzen Arts Center of the American University Museum in Washington, D.C. opened an exhibit of ceramic wall panels crafted by Jim Melchert. Exhibition notes described Jim as "a central figure in the San Francisco ... ceramic arts movement" presenting "a rare solo showing on the East Coast". Finally, at a dinner in May, The American Committee on Foreign Relations presented their Distinguished Service Award to Bob Oakley in recognition of his efforts to advance "American public discourse of foreign policy".

REQUIESCANT. Tom Dosdall reported the death of Frank Andrews on August 8, 2006 in Aliso Viejo, California. George Newlin advised that Jim Beck died in Princeton on August 13, 2006.
Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for September 27, 2006
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

ANNUAL GIVING '06. Annual Giving capoDon Malehorn gave a justifiably upbeat summary of the Class achievement in the campaign just ended. A record 80.7 percent of the Class donated a total of $450,504. Not only was the participation percentage a first for '52, it tied for second place among all classes after 1936. The leading class, '56, led us by less than a percentage point, while we tied our old rivals in '51. The dollar amount was the third highest off-year total in our history, exceeded only in 2001 and 2005. The total was also third among all off-year classes. As he always does, Don insisted that his team get the credit they so richly deserve.John Emery, backed by some 50 telephone solicitors, managed the participation effort. Jay Sherrerd and Joe Bolster, with a major assist, despite ongoing health problems, from Dick Pivirotto, concentrated on larger gifts.

FAREWELL. Russ McNeil of Audubon, Pennsylvania died on June 6, 2006, the same day his granddaughter, Amy Bregar '06, received her bachelor's degree from Princeton. At a memorial observance on June 10 in Norristown, Pennsylvania, family and friends reminisced about Russ. Among those who contributed to the picture of a much-loved family man and respected citizen was Howie Wentz. Also on hand from the Class were George Aman, John Clutz, Tom Daubert, Jack Joyce, and Jay Sherrerd.

REQUIESCANT. The Class has learned that: David Giles of Eureka Springs, Arkansas died on April 16. 2006; Joe Wilson died on April 25, 2006 in El Dorado, Arkansas; Alan Allen of Salem, South Carolina died on May 19, 2006; Barry Cruikshank died on June 24, 2006 in Keansburg, New Jersey.

Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for July 12, 2006
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

FIFTY-FOURTH REUNION. Our off-year gathering began Friday evening, June 2, with the traditional dinner at Mary and Bill Murdoch's. A group of three dozen or so enjoyed a sumptuous buffet and Nassoons concert beforehand. Hal Saunders, in his toast to Mary and Bill, noted that this dinner was the last they would host for the Class in their home on Orchard Circle. They will have moved to a retirement community outside Princeton but will continue to entertain classmates at dinner three times a year. Another feature of the occasion was the presence of four class associates, widows of classmates. They were: Grace Brush, Ruth Kahn, Annette Merle-Smith, and Sandy Tatnall. On Saturday, about fifteen hardy souls made up the '52 contingent as the incomparable P-rade got underway on wet grounds but with no rain. Our 50th Reunion gonfalon banners were carried with pride by Joe Bolster, Jim Davis, and Hoby Kreitler. Dampness did not diminish cheers from younger classes, the graduating seniors of '06 in particular, at the sight of our striped blazers and classic banners.

MINI BY THE BAY. Planned and managed by John Lowry, Bruce Atwater, and Bill Seavey, the San Francisco Mini XXI delighted 79 classmates and about the same number of wives and other guests on May 4-6, 2006. Headquarters for the Mini was the Hotel Vitale, described as a small, boutique hotel. On opening day, Bruce Atwater took a group to the Gap Corporate Art Collection. That evening, everyone gathered at the One Market restaurant for dinner, after which half the group attended a hilarious, topical revue at a downtown theater. Friday, May 5, was spent across the Bay with a small, active group at the Atwater home for hiking, tennis, and swimming, and a larger group visiting the Seavey Vineyard in the Napa Valley. Both groups reassembled for dinner at a venue described as "a center for wine, food, and the arts". All three were top quality. On Saturday, the last full day, the group split between two world-famous San Francisco institutions: the DeYoung Museum and the former Federal prison at Alcatraz. Lunch was at a Chinese restaurant followed by a free afternoon and final dinner at the St. Francis Yacht Club. (Many thanks to Mini participants Joe Bolster, Jerry Canter, Walt Culin, Jim Davis, John Lowry, and Steve Rogers for their reports on various phases of this extraordinary occasion.)

FAREWELL. John Clutz and Joe Bolster reported the death of Doc Buyers on May 20, 2006 in Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania. Doc's funeral was on May 31 at the Pequea Presbyterian Church near Gap, Pennsylvania. Two daughters and a son-in-law were readers, while his nephew, Bob, gave the eulogy. Grandsons and nephews served as pallbearers, and a choir of Doc's children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews sang America the Beautiful. The casket was draped with an American flag in recognition of Doc's Marine Corps service before entering Princeton. Before the casket was lowered, two Marine Corps noncommissioned officers carefully removed and folded the flag and then presented it to Elsie Buyers. A classmate present wrote: "From start to finish,it was an impressive service." Among those attending were classmates Joe Bolster, Fred Jones, Dick Kazmaier, Hoby Kreitler, Tom Mangan, John McGillicuddy, Paul Moeller, and Jay Sherrerd.

REQUIESCANT. The University reported that Bob Van Dyke died on April 17, 2006. At the time of his death, he was a resident of Kobe Sound, Florida. Also reported was the death of Carl Colyer on April 29, 2006 in Rutland, Vermont.
Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for June 7, 2006
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


AUTHORS. Advancing years may have slowed but certainly not stopped the varied output of class authors. Al Gilgen's seventh psychology text is in progress. Dick Billings provides no information about his new book, Battleground Atlantic, except the title. John Geyman tackles current health care issues in two new books. Jim Armstrong discussed abortion in the Journal of Scientific Exploration as the sole provider of the procedure in northwestern Montana. Hal Saunders' book Politics Is About Relationship "focuses on ... citizens in and out of government and the relationships they form to solve public problems". Finally, George Newlin's detailed investigations of Victorian novelists have already produced anthologies of Dickens and Trollope (four volumes each) followed recently by a mere two volumes on George Eliot with Thomas Hardy next. In his words, a "media frenzy" has produced excellent articles about George in The TimesTown Topics.

FAREWELL I. A memorial service for Elizabeth Duffield took place April 20 at the Church of the Good Shepherd in Burke, Virginia. Among the Tiger contingent were, from '52: Annie and Ted Beck, Jerry Canter, Elinor and Harry Emlet, Lily and Phil Hill, Jean and Barry Loper, Jack McCune, Suie and John McShane, Mary and Bill Murdoch, Kent and Steve Rogers, Jay Sherrerd, and Chappie Wagner; and from '53: John Beck (Ted's brother).

FAREWELL II. Don Malehorn and George Newlin reported that Don Kahn died April 27 in Edison, New Jersey. At a service for Don on April 30 at Temple Neve Shalom in Metuchen, New Jersey, speakers, none more eloquent than his elder son, Jonathan '84, emphasized Don's years of_voluntary service to Metuchen, his home for most of his life. Present from '52: John Emery, John Helm, Don Malehorn, Mary and Bill Murdoch, George Newlin, and Carol and Hal Saunders.

REQUIESCAT. Jim Rockwell advised that Ed Caddy died April 17 in Bolingbrook, Illinois. of Trenton and Princeton's

Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for May 10, 2006
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

RECOGNITION. A half dozen classmates can claim noteworthy achievements. Pete Mueller was co-author of an article in a professional journal asserting that he and his colleague had identified a pharmacological treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder. Bob Jiranek drew on his lifelong love of horses to found Equs, Incorporated in Danville, Virginia. Bob says Equs will "provide equestrian instructors for local students and teenagers" with the objective of using "the horse to teach character". Bob Doherty advises that Sam Hartwell's "Project Strive", which helps ghetto kids to their feet with education, job training and placement, "is just a phenomenal success", featured on 60 Minutes and established in 14 major cities. Coke Florance reports that the Normandy Visitors Center, which he designed, is under construction and "on budget - so far". After Harvard Law and private practice in Portland, Oregon, Jack Collins joined the U.S. Attorney's office there. Along with landmark environmental and white-collar crime cases, Jack is distinguished for indicting in absentia the notorious sky-jacker D. B. Cooper who in 1971 parachuted with $200,000 cash from a passenger jet over Washington state, never to be seen again. Finally, Steve Rogers was present when Frank Carlucci received The International Business Leadership Award from The Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training at their dinner in Washington, D.C. on February 23, 2006. Steve wrote that Frank accepted the award with "brief, entertaining, and modest remarks". Also on hand were Bob and Phyllis Oakley.

SETTLERS. Mac Powell reports enjoying his sixth spring in California's Napa Valley. Another Golden State resident, Fred Mann, plans to build a vacation home in New Zealand to enjoy their summers during our winters.

REQUIESCANT. The Alumni Records Office reports that John Stadter died December 7, 2003. At the time of his death, John was a resident of Naples, Florida. The Class also learned that Ed Mortimer died on November 22, 2005 in Atlanta.
Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for April 19, 2006
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

SAD NEWS. Mike Ely called to report that his son, Douglas '79, died March 2 in Bethesda, Maryland in a bizarre traffic accident. The younger Ely drove under an overpass just as a truckload of lumber overturned on the roadway above. The lumber dropped over the side of the overpass directly onto Douglas' car and crushed it. Douglas was an academic star, summa cum laude at Princeton and a law review editor at Columbia Law School. A vice president and assistant general counsel for Marriott International, Inc., he left a wife and two children. Mike gave a brief, eloquent eulogy to the 600 or more who attended Douglas1 funeral.

THIRD GENERATIONS. In the course of a year, information flows in about grandchildren. From Houston, Dave Smith reports the baptism of his fourth granddaughter, and now counts six grandchildren. From the same Texas metropolis, Bob Johnston advises that all is well in his family that has added two more-grandchildren. Banks AndersonBob Doherty finds it "very sobering" that some of his grandchildren are about to enter college. Part of "sobering" is the cost per grandchild per year. Farther north, Fred Kaufman writes that his family, including seven grandchildren, has acclimated to the New Hampshire lakes region. Ben Moore claims 18 grandchildren and step-grandchildren, perhaps the current Class record. But Tink and Joe Bolster have so many children, spouses, significant others, and grandchildren that their family Christmas card is a six-page brochure. This is an invaluable aid in keeping track of their clan and shows that the grandchild count last Christmas was 13, a number that is sure to grow.

AND A FOURTH. Mal Cleland finds it "hard to imagine" that he has four great-grandchildren, another potential current Class record.
now has 11 grandchildren spread in ages between the youngest recently baptized and the eldest a freshman at Duke.
Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for April 5, 2006
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

ALUMNI DAY, 2006. Alumni Day on February 24 was a time to see classmates and applaud the University's top performers. We began Friday with an Executive Committee meeting followed by a delicious buffet at Mary and Bill Murdoch's. At Saturday's Alumni Day luncheon in Jadwin Gym, alumni accomplishments in student recruiting and Annual Giving were recognized as were the top six graduate and undergraduate students, winners of the Jacobus and Pyne awards respectively. Last on the program were introductions of the distinguished recipients of the Madison Medal and Wilson Award. Later, at the Service of Remembrance, we honored, among others, the 17 members of the Class who died in 2005. Treasurer John Clutz was our representative in the procession of classes. Saturday evening, we had our Class dinner at the Friend Center. Our speaker was David Dobkin, Dean of the Faculty. He spoke wittily about the hazards of recruiting and managing talented faculty but emphasized Princeton's unusual sense of community, crediting the alumni body for its contribution. Thereupon, President Hal Saunders sent us on our way.

VIGNETTES. Seen and heard during Alumni Day events. Bruce Coe's wife, Barbara, described how the rampaging Delaware River had three times forced them out of their waterfront home. The Coes are now eyeing a house on higher ground. Roger McLean handed out copies of a piece from a Boston paper describing the unlikely but lifelong friendship between Sam Gwynne and old time Red Sox star, Dave "Boo" Ferriss. Author of the piece was Sam's son. Class President Hal Saunders and his wife, Carol, arrived a moment late for the Alumni Day luncheon to find our three tables full and had to sit with '53. Mary Murdoch told us that she and Bill were moving to a retirement community in Princeton but hastened to assure us that their traditional dinners for the Class would continue without interruption.

Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for March 22, 2006
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

VOYAGERS. Several classmates report visits to nearer and farther corners of the world. Ed Tiyakian checked out the island of Madagascar. He found lemurs and crocodiles but no tigers. Bob Stott, Pete Mathews, and Dunc StephensParker Monroes celebrated their fiftieth anniversary by taking eleven family members for a week cruising the Caribbean. Lucy and Bill MacIlvaine found that three weeks in China were "a great education".

TOUR GUIDES. Some classmates accompany travelers to make their journeys more informative. Patty and Bud Foulke have been doing this for years and have become co-presidents of the Travel Journalists Guild. Mike Ely ventured into the field as a lecturer on an Elderhostel cruise to Japan, Taiwan and Vietnam.

IF ONLY... Fred Schumacher tells how he almost became a tropical magnate, then was lucky to escape with his skin intact. The year was 1985; the locale Tanzania. Three years previously, Fred had started a safari operation there which was flourishing with two years of advance bookings. He was weighing an offer to buy a large coffee plantation. Owning both businesses would have made Fred the "Big Daddy" of that part of Africa. That Fred is not now ruling a tropical paradise is the result of a Tanzanian army mutiny which threatened all foreigners with gross bodily harm. Fred and Birte flew out from the local airport with only the clothes on their backs. As Fred writes, "It all ended in one bad day. So much for adventure."

all took their spouses at various times to Alaska. For Pete and Lee, it was a fiftieth anniversary gift to themselves after taking their family to Russia. Dunc and Eileen could claim they had been to all 50 states. Bob and Heidi came home:, repacked and were off to one of their "favorite places in the world", Bellagio on Italy's Lake Como. Elsewhere, the
Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for March 8, 2006
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

FAREWELL. Jay Sherrerd advised that five classmates attended John Laupheimer's funeral on January 4, 2006 at St. Rose Church in Short Hills, New Jersey. Dick Kazmaier and John McGillicuddy each delivered a eulogy. Also present were Chuck DeVoe, George Stevens and Jay. All but Jay were John's roommates junior and senior years.

SAD NEWS. Bill McGarry, our senior member (our commencement came about a week after his thirtieth birthday), reported that his wife, Martha, died in February 2005. The McGarrys were married before Bill matriculated at Princeton after serving as a fighter pilot in WW II. Both of their children were born during Bill's undergraduate years. Mal Powell

VIGOROUS LIVES. Three classmates stay active on the golf course or in the air, while a fourth has been grounded for medical reasons. Warren Bruce, a lifelong aviator, was overjoyed to pass his flight physical at age 75. His first move after getting cleared was to buy his "last" airplane, a "sweet little Cessna 150". The golfers, Bill Ragland and Dunc Stephens, were pleased with their accomplishments in 2005, albeit at different levels of the game. Bill wrote that of 19 rounds he played in August last year, he shot his age (75) or better 10 times. Dunc was pleased to report that he finally broke 90 and hopes to improve on that score in the future. Jet Rutter, a water sports enthusiast, told us that last year his aches and pains from several recent operations had caused him to give up surfing and reluctantly retire to the beach.
reported that his oldest daughter, Alison, and her husband, Jim Sapikowski, died in 2005 but gave no further details.

Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for February 15, 2006
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

COUNSELORS PAST AND PRESENT. On January 8, President Bush gathered 13 former Secretaries of State and Defense to meet with him, the Vice President (himself a former defense secretary) and the present incumbents at State and Defense. Of the 16 current and former senior national security officials present, four were Princetonians: George Shultz '42, Donald Rumsfeld '54, and our own Jim Baker and Frank Carlucci. Woodrow Wilson would have been proud of the Tiger delegation.

"MICRO-REUNIONS". We have reports of three less glamorous but more relaxed gatherings of classmates. Burt Weiss writes that he and Al Sloan with their wives spent a "great weekend" last August with Joyce and Ben Saler at the Salers' summer place in Spruce Head, Maine. Also in August, Elizabeth and Hobey Henderson marked their 50th wedding anniversary with a dinner in the Philadelphia suburbs. On hand were classmates George Aman, Stokes Carrigan, John Clutz, and George McNelis and their wives. Happy memories of the occasion were muted by news of the death of George McNelis only four days later. Finally, in the unlikely venue of an October regional conference of the Colonial Dames in Seattle, Bill MacIlvaine, Larry McNichols, and Eric Merrifield sat on the sidelines while Lucy Macllvaine, Lannie McNichols, and Kitty Merrifield, Colonial Dames all, conferred.

Class Notes for January 25, 2006
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)







EYE OF THE STORM. Herb Kaufman is the only classmate whose permanent home is in the impact area of Hurricane Katrina, in his case, downtown New Orleans. Wondering what might have happened to Herb, Don Kahn worked the phones a few days after the storm and learned that Herb rode out the worst of it in his ninth-floor condo. However, soon after the storm passed, Herb mustered his family and headed for Texas. A follow-up call revealed that Herb and family returned home in mid-October. Since then, Herb has shifted his medical practice to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, about an hour north of New Orleans.

AN ADDENDUM. A recent item in these Notes mentioned two classmates celebrating the second anniversaries of their heart transplants. Left open was the possibility that there were transplantees of whom we kneweth not. Sure enough, we learned from Hank Sherk, a distinguished Philadelphia orthopedic surgeon, that our classmate Walt Weidler had a heart transplant about eight years ago and is still going strong. Yet later, we learned from Fred Jones, Hank's Princeton roommate, that the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons chose Hank to write the new history of the academy.

"MICRO"-REUNIONS I.
Lefty Thomas reported that a notable sports weekend for Princeton teams, October 22-24 in Boston, was made more rewarding by the presence of old friends, Lefty (center) was joined by John WintonBuzz Berckmans (right) from Miami. [Watch for the photo in the print edition of the Class Notes.] With a larger group of classmates, the three spent Saturday afternoon watching the Tiger football team beat Harvard for the first time in a decade. The rest of the weekend they were on hand for the Head of the Charles, America's largest rowing race, in which hundreds of crews of all ages and experience levels and both genders row a three-mile course against time on the Charles River. Buzz is a "Head" veteran, having competed successfully in his age group for single sculls. Later, he served on the committee that supervises the competition. Our three amigos and all the Princetonians who watched were immensely excited by the achievements of the Tiger's men's and women's varsity eights. Rowing in the elite divisions, the women placed second to the U.S. national eight while the men came in first against elite international and American crews.

"MICRO"-REUNIONS II. Other classmate gatherings included this meeting at the Union Club in San Jose, Costa Rica. At left and right are Steve Rogers and Walt Culin. In the center is their host, our classmate in Costa Rica, Alberto Gonzalez. [Photo in the print PAW.] From the West Coast, Jay Master reports that he catches up "from time to time" with Jack Dodds and Tom Dosdall on various Southern California golf courses. Bob Doherty reported that, with Jack Ball and Sam Hartwell, he attended the funeral of a long-time friend in Kennebunkport, Maine. The deceased was an Eli as was "a platoon of other Yale folks" among the mourners, most notably former President George H.W. Bush.

REQUIESCAT. The Class has learned that Tom Worthington died October 22, 2005 in Zurich, Switzerland.
Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for December 14, 2005
(as submitted to the
Princeton Alumni Weekly)

        GIVING BACK.  Loyal Mercersburg Academy alumnus and past President of the school's Board of Regents, Ed Masinter, with his wife, Margery, has funded establishment of the Mercersburg Outdoor Education program.  The grant endowed an Outdoor Education Director's Chair last year and the renovation and conversion of the school barn into the new Masinter Outdoor Education Center.  The headmaster, faculty, students, and alumni, as well as Ed's Princeton roommate, Phil Hill, and his wife, Lily, raised a champagne toast to Ed and Margery at the dedication ceremony last May.  Thereafter, nothing daunted, Margery tried out the new center's climbing wall.

        SOX AND TIGERSRoger McLean invited classmates Dick Kazmaier, Geoff Nunes and John Parker to join him in front-row seats for a Boston Red Sox game in July.  Three months later, Roger was in Cambridge with a '52 contingent cheering the Tigers' defeat of Harvard.  On hand were Bruce Berckmans, Reed Hartel, Dick Kazmaier, Geoff Nunes, Lefty Thomas, Bob Warren, and John Winton.

        DOG'S BEST FRIEND.  Recent letters from John LaGrua and George Hambleton have described how their lives are enriched by their canine companions.  John and his Springer, Bentley, take the air in Central Park.  George jogs around Mendham, New Jersey or Maine's Bar Harbor with his Springer, Scrapple, and Labrador, Stoli (short for Stolichnaya).

        AN APOLOGY.  Class President Hal Saunders writes: "You may have seen the memorial for Landon Peters (PAW Sept. 14).  Unfortunately, it contains errors in fact and spelling of proper names and omits significant accomplishments in Landon's life.  I have sent my apology to Landon's widow, Pete.  A corrected memorial appears on the class website and will appear in the online version of the PAW.  Or you may write me for a copy.  The PAW will run its own correction."

        REQUIESCATJohn Birkelund and Bob Lovell reported that Steve Bray died October 12, 2005 in Norwalk, Connecticut.

                                                                                       Dan Duffield 
    

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Class Notes for November 16, 2005
(as submitted to the
Princeton Alumni Weekly)

        ALL THAT JAZZ.  Careful readers of The New York Times and Smithsonian magazine will have spotted articles during the past several months about Frank Driggs and his unique collection of jazz memorabilia.  Frank's consuming interest in jazz has led him to assemble some 100,000 items such as sheet music, playbills, and over 78,000 photographs of jazz musicians from the obscure to legends like Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong.  A jazz scholar has appraised the whole collection at $1.5 million.  Frank does a good business providing prints to jazz researchers, most notably film-maker Ken Burns for his documentary on the history of jazz.  The jazz era is over as new popular music forms have taken hold, but it lives still in Frank's monumental collection.

        HEALTH MATTERS.  John LaGrua and Frank Sparrow are notable as the two heart transplant recipients in the Class (that we know of).  Both had the procedure about two years ago and are equally upbeat today.  John: "Happy days are here again."  Frank: "Doing well and feeling great."  But the most succinct health message this year comes from Terry Liebman.  His good news in two words: "Still breathing."

        FAREWELL.  There were two services for Art Collins.  His funeral was on September 7, 2005 at Kent School's St. Joseph's Chapel in Kent, Connecticut.  Art attended Kent and maintained a lifelong connection with the school in alumni affairs, as a trustee, and, most significant, as the planner and architect for the renovation and expansion of the campus several years ago. Cliff Barr joined three family members and Kent's headmaster as a eulogist.  Classmates present were Chips Chester, Al Ellis and Bob Jiranek.  At a memorial service in Darien, Connecticut on September 12, Bob Warren spoke about his days with Art in school and college.  Also on hand were Al Ellis, Hoby Kreitler, Jim Sparkman, and Lucius Wilmerding.

                                                                                     Dan Duffield      

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Class Notes for November 2, 2005
(as submitted to the
Princeton Alumni Weekly)

 
       BRAVO
.  Roger Berlind had a busy spring.  In April, he and author A. Scott Berg '71 gave the Gilbert Lecture at the Berlind Theater in Princeton.  The format was a dialogue: "Producing for Broadway".  In May, Roger received The Actors' Fund Medal of Honor for sustained achievement in the theater.  Finally, in a now-familiar ritual in June, Roger accepted his 13th Tony award for production of the drama Doubt, a Parable. No one in American theater has won as many Tony's for production, making Roger a Broadway legend in his own time.

        STILL GOING.  Two classmates continue to compete.  Chuck DeVoe won this year's National Hard Court championships for the 75-plus age group in singles and, paired with his former Princeton teammate Gerry Thomas '51, in doubles.  Joe Handelman, sore feet notwithstanding, ran a 50-kilometer race the day after his 75th birthday, earning second place in the 70-plus age group.

        MEDICAL NOTES.  Bill Gough wrote that Ben Harer addressed Bill's Foundation for Mind-Being Research in Los Altos, California last May.  Ben drew on his two vocations, medicine and Egyptology, to describe the art of medicine in ancient Egypt.  Pete Mueller visited Allen Dulles '51 in Santa Fe, New Mexico ten years after Allen came to him for treatment.  After Allen sustained a severe head wound during combat in Korea, military and civilian doctors failed to restore his mental capacity.  With a revised diagnosis and treatment plan, Pete helped Alien recover almost completely from the effects of his wound.

        MOVES.  Two classmates reported recent moves.  Marshall Keating returned to New York City after the death of his wife, Pegeen, in December, 2003.  Ginger and Vic Hall sold their insurance agency in Winston-Salem and moved into a retirement community in Davidson, North Carolina.

        REQUIESCATJohn Peak reported that Bill Wolff died September 3, 2005 in Laguna Beach, California.

                                                                                    Dan Duffield      

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Class Notes for October 19, 2005
(as submitted to the
Princeton Alumni Weekly)


        MINI BY THE BAY
.  With a Host Committee of fourteen classmates hard at work, a plan for a memorable Mini XXI in San Francisco and environs on May 4-7, 2006 has emerged.   Following registration and dinner on Thursday, May 4, Friday will be devoted touring the Napa Valley wine country with dinner that evening at Mary and Bill Seavey's St. Helena winery.  Saturday is dedicated to visiting the city's world-class museums and other attractions followed by dinner at the St. Francis Yacht Club.  The mini ends after brunch Sunday, but the committee will help arrange trips before or after to one of Northern California's marvelous tourist venues such as Monterey or Yosemite National Park.  If you are interested, even though uncertain of your final decision, write Bill Seavey at 1310 Conn Valley, St. Helena, CA 94574, phone (707)963-8339, or E-mail John Lowry at Lowry315fearthlink.net without delay.

        YALE GAME.  Saturday, November 12, the Tiger football team renews its long-standing rivalry with Yale at Princeton Stadium.  The game offers a great opportunity to meet classmates beforehand at the picnic-style lunch in Jadwin Gym, during the game itself, and afterward at the class cocktail party in the Icahn Laboratory across Washington Road from the stadium.  Win or lose, it should be a great day.

        FAREWELL.  John Clutz reports that he attended the memorial service for George McNelis on August 30 at Our Mother of Consolation Church in Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania.  Stokes Carrigan, George's Princeton roommate, in his eulogy spoke of their days on campus.  Other classmates attending were George Aman, Tom Daubert, Hank Sherk, and Jay Sherrerd.

        REQUIESCANT.  Connie Smith died on July 16, 2005 in Union, Kentucky.  Ron Altmayer died on August 8, 2005 in Manhasset, New York.  Cliff Barr reported that Art Collins died on September 3, 2005 in Wilton, Connecticut.

                                                                                     Dan Duffield      
 
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Class Notes for October 5, 2005
(as submitted to the
Princeton Alumni Weekly)

        ANNUAL GIVING 2005
.  Phone calls to the AG office and Class Agent Don Malehorn revealed that '52 had a very good year in 2005.  Our dollar total was $463,416, up 5.5% from 2004, and our 465 givers, or 79.2% of the class, just five people short of our 80% participation goal.  In dollars, we placed second among all post-WWII classes observing off-year reunions, and in donor percentage, second among all postwar classes.  Pleased with the excellent returns, Don emphasized that, once again, '52 had almost 70 classmates at work during the campaign, his trusty lieutenants Joe Bolster, John Emery, Dick Pivirotto, and Jay Sherrerd backed by over five dozen telephone solicitors.  Another distinction for '52 was the announcement that 77 classmates are now members of the 1746 Society, the largest delegation from any class.  (The 1746 Society consists of alumni participating in planned giving to the University.)

        RESEARCH GRANT
Paul Glenn wrote that his Glenn Foundation will commit five million dollars to Harvard Medical School to help develop a research facility to investigate the biological mechanisms of aging.  The Glenn Foundation has concentrated on this type of research since its founding in 1965.  In Harvard's announcement, Paul said, "We structured this partnership ... to push aging research forward more quickly and to new levels of knowledge."  In his note to the Secretary, Paul, in a lighter vein, wrote: "I'm trying to keep '52 above ground a while longer, to attend our 75th Reunion."

        MINI XXI
.  San Francisco will host our next mini-reunion on May 4-6, 2006.  The organizing junta, Bruce Atwater, John Lowry, and Bill Seavey, is already taking care of the groundwork.  Stay tuned for more information.

        REQUIESCANT
.  Seton Hall University announced that Rev. Don Smith died July 7, 2005 in Livingston, New Jersey.  John Clutz reported that George McNelis died August 20, 2005 in Philadelphia.
                                                                                    Dan Duffield      
 
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Class Notes for September 14, 2005
(as submitted to the
Princeton Alumni Weekly)

        REUNION NUGGETS.  Seen and heard at our 53rd.  Our Actus Classicus gonfalons carried proudly by George Aman, Joe Bolster, and Bob Eby.  Dick Pivirotto, affable and faultlessly tailored as always, even in a reunion jacket; and Mimi, looking far too youthful to be the grandmother of 14.  Vic Bihl marching the entire P-rade route and thereby defying the aches and pains of advanced age.  Tom Daubert in his golf cart keeping intact his string of reunions attended. Will Garwood celebrating with son Will, Jr. '79 and grandson Will, III '05 by marching with '52 and then joining '79.  John Helm catching up with his niece Nancy Van Meter '80 at her twenty-fifth.  Ted McAlister, one of Princeton's most prolific recruiters, bringing his godson up from Texas to see Old Nassau.  Jay Sherrerd stopping every few steps along the P-rade route to greet people in what seemed to be every class.  Afterward, he denied that he knew every one who matriculated at Princeton from WWII to today.  It only seemed that way.

        FAREWELL
.  Devoted wife, beloved mother and grandmother, and prominent citizen of Philadelphia, Kathy Sherrerd died June 23, 2005 in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania.  On June 28, more than 600 packed the Church of the Redeemer in Bryn Mawr for a memorial service which featured spoken and sung tributes to Kathy from three generations of Sherrerds.  University President and honorary classmate, Shirley Tilghman, led the large Princeton delegation.  Classmates attending included George Aman, Joe Bolster, Stokes Carrigan, John Clutz, Chuck Devoe, John Emery, Dick Kazmaier, Hoby Kreitler, Eric Merrifield, Geoff Nunes, Dick Pivirotto, and Tom Unterberg.  (Thanks to Joe Bolster and John Clutz for their help in preparing this account.)

        REQUIESCANT
.  John Clutz reported that Phil Sturges died May 24, 2005 in Boston. The class learned from Rudy Lehnert that Bob Cowen died June 4, 2005 in Knoxville, Tennessee.

                                                                              Dan Duffield
      


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Class Notes for July 6, 2005
(as submitted to the
Princeton Alumni Weekly)

      
        REUNIONS 2005.  A total of 31 classmates signed in for our 53rd Reunion, with headquarters at Princeton Stadium as a satellite of 1950's 55th.  The opening event was our customary dinner at Bill and Mary Murdoch's home where we had a delicious dinner, great company, and a concert by the campus singing group, the Katzenjammers.  Next day, the incomparable P-rade went into the history books for the wrong reason.  Classes from 1925 through 1994 marched in pleasantly warm weather under partly cloudy skies.  As the Class of 1995 stepped on the field at the end of the P'rade route, the wind blew and the rain fell in sheets.  The P'rade dissolved as every one ran for cover.  The exception was a large group of seniors who finished their first P'rade with the traditional "rush" to the reviewing stand - long since vacated.  With that esprit and grit, 2005 should become one of the great Princeton classes - certainly worthy of a salute from the great Class of 1952.

             KUDOS.  George Garrett has written 30 books and edited about 20 others.  Late in his career, the awards threaten to outnumber the books.  Last fall, George received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Library of Virginia, and in April, the Cleanth Brooks Medal for Distinguished Achievement in Southern Letters from the Fellowship of Southern Writers.

             RECOGNITION.  Hats off: to Jerry Canter, named a 2005 Father of the Year by the Washington, D.C. Father's Day Council; to Randy Barker, honored by Phillips Exeter Academy for his work as an agricultural economist in Asia; and to John Birkelund, named to the national governing body of Phi Beta Kappa.

             BIG WINDS.  Florida got hit by four hurricanes in six weeks late last summer.  Near Tampa, Parker Monroe saw his neighbor's house wrecked while his own home was unscathed.  From Vero Beach, Bob Stott's reaction in one word: "Wow!"
                                                                                  Dan Duffield           

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Class Notes for June 8, 2005
(as submitted to the
Princeton Alumni Weekly)

        ADVENTURES ABROAD.  The allure of foreign travel took some classmates far afield (or to sea).  Lucy and Bill MacIlvaine, along with their son and daughter-in-law, cruised the Bahamas in a chartered sailboat.  Shortly thereafter, the senior MacIlvaines traveled to northern Europe where they visited Moscow, St. Petersburg, Helsinki, and the Baltic republics.  Others headed for Asia.  Gloria and Phil May walked on China's Great Wall and marveled at the huge Yangtze dam.  Kitty and Fred Mann, with son David, toured Japan's historic old cities of Nara and Kyoto.  Sally and Hoby Kreitler with Conna and John McGillicuddy were on Scottish links for eleven straight days of golf.  No carts.  Every one walked all the courses.  As John wrote: "Not bad for 'old folks'."  Finally, Dave Hawks went on two windjammer cruises to exotic parts, one to Tahiti and Polynesia, the other to the ports of the Aegean Sea.  Dave said he couldn't wait to take another cruise.

             PROGRESS REPORT.  In a gracious note, Jane Dean told of her lunch with Sara Wright last January in Paris.  She learned that Jeff Wright is receiving excellent care as he continues to recover from a series of strokes several years ago.

             TRAGIC LOSS.  Toby Strachan called to report that his son, Malcolm Strachan, III, was killed in the crash of a private plane near Warren, Pennsylvania on April 11, 2005.  Malcolm, 43, was a successful businessman who leaves a wife and two stepchildren.

             REQUIESCANT.  Landon Peters died April 9, 2005 in New Brunswick, New Jersey.  Toby Strachan reported that Jack Sanders died April 21, 2005 in Snyder, New York.

             FAREWELLBill Murdoch called to describe the impressive memorial service for Landon Peters at Princeton's Trinity Episcopal Church on April 12, 2005.  On hand, along with Bill, were classmates Joe Bolster, Jim Laughlin, Tony Meyer, Mary Murdoch, George Newlin, Joe Salas, and Jerry Uhl.
                                                                                        Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for May 11, 2005
(as submitted to the
Princeton Alumni Weekly)

              MINI XX. Our twentieth mini-reunion took place March 31-April 3, 2005 in historic, bustling Savannah, Georgia hosted by Walt Culin, Park Callahan, Larry Austin, and their wives.  Fifty-eight classmates, two class associates, along with wives and friends brought the total on hand to 117.  The opening reception and dinner featured a description of the Princeton-Savannah connection by a retired prep school headmaster from the Class of 1964.

              Friday was all about the city of Savannah.  The group viewed "old" Savannah with its historic streets and squares all draped with blooming azaleas.  Then, on board a harbor tour boat, we saw the modern seaport, one of the busiest on the East Coast.  At our hotel, an afternoon current affairs discussion focused on North Korea and government policy after 9/11/2001.  Then on to a maritime museum for a tour and buffet dinner under a tent which provided welcome shelter from the rain.

              Saturday's highlights were visits to the historic Wormsloe Plantation and the Eighth Air Force museum.  At Wormsloe, our guide, thanks to Dede Austin, was the awesomely elegant mistress of the house, still lived in by the descendants of the colonial founder.  A separate group at the Eighth Air Force display was intrigued to hear the voice of Bill McGarry among the recorded reminiscences of WWII air combat.  Bill, our oldest classmate - 83 this June - was a fighter pilot in, of course, the Eighth Air Force.  At that evening's dinner at the Chatham Club, John Lowry previewed Mini XXI next spring in San Francisco.

              Sunday brunch at the Oglethorpe Club wrapped things up.  Carol Culin, speaking for the organizing committee, said everything went "smoothly".  A classmate who has been to every mini termed the Savannah conclave "a rousing success".  (Secretary's note. This account was based on contributions from Joe Bolster and Walt Culin.) 
                                                                               Dan Duffield

 
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Class Notes for April 20, 2005
(as submitted to the
Princeton Alumni Weekly)

              RECOGNITION.  George Newlin's masterpiece, Everyone and Everything in Trollope, is technically an "anthology, index and topical concordance".  In fact, it's four volumes of some thousand pages each, a total of 2.5 million words.  (Secretary's note: an earlier Class Note said, in error, 3.5 million words.) As quoted in the NY Times (March 6, 2005 NJ edition), one prominent scholar of Victorian literature praised George for his indifference to current academic fashion: "George demonstrates the value of positivist scholarship ... He is interested in the text, in the history - he's interested in embedding the work in its context ..."

              To honor George, Firestone Library's Department of Rare Books and Special Collections hosted a reception at the library on February 4, 2005.  Some 60 people were on hand, including classmates and/or their family members: Ross Forgan's widow, Kathy; Meredith, John Moore's daughter; Jean and Dick Quandt ; and Sam Van Culin.

              AROUND THE HORN.  Along with other contributions to Princeton and the class, Jay Sherrerd is a major donor of news items for Class Notes.  Most recently, during January 2005, he visited or gathered news of eight classmates.  Jay and Kathy spent New Year's in Palm Desert, California, at the winter home of Jane and Paul Mueller.  Then on to the "Big Island" of Hawaii for a business meeting and socializing with Doc Buyers and Dick Kazmaier while admiring Doc's lovely new home outside Hilo.  Working the phones back home, Jay spoke to John Laupheimer who advised that he will soon move back to London where his wife, Sally, becomes a senior executive at British Petroleum.  A call to John Emery brought the welcome news that John was mending after recent back and knee surgery.  Finally, Jay learned that Florida golfer Hoby Kreitler spends time on the links with Tom Knight and John McGillicuddy.

              REQUIESCAT.  Dave Kass reported that Bud Foote died March 12, 2005 in Atlanta.
  
                                                                                 Dan Duffield
 

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Class Notes for April 6, 2005
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

              ALUMNI DAY '05.  February 26 in Princeton was clear and cold with enough snow to dress up the campus.  For '52 the proceedings began the previous evening as Bill and Mary Murdoch opened their doors to three dozen for their usual delicious buffet dinner.  Saturday we joined some thousand other guests for the Alumni Association's mid-winter meeting and luncheon.  We applauded, with admiration verging on awe, the awards for especially productive alumni and stupendously talented graduate and undergraduate students.  Before the meeting closed, our honorary classmate, Shirley Tilghman, succinctly but eloquently described Alumni Day as an occasion dedicated to friendship and the celebration of excellence.

              The Service of Remembrance in the Chapel honored all Princetonians who died in 2004. Current class policy is that the role of representative in the formal procession will rotate among class officers.  This year was the Secretary's turn.  To take part in this moving ceremony elevated it from impressive to awesome.

              The day ended with the class mid-winter dinner at the Computer Science Building.  A convivial gathering and a fine dinner were capped by an outstanding presentation by Provost Chris Eisgruber '83.  We departed, convinced that the future of Princeton is in good hands.

              STARS.  Former roommates Chuck Devoe and John Laupheimer still shine in the worlds of tennis and golf respectively.  Jim Davis reported that Chuck came east for the World Seniors Tennis Championships in September.  In the 70+ age group, Chuck reached the semi-finals in singles and was runner-up in the doubles championship.  Meanwhile, John McGillicuddy reported that the New York Golf Writers Association honored Laup for his lifetime contributions to golf at a dinner in Rye, New York last fall.

              REQUIESCAT.  From Geoff Nunes the class learned that Phil Porter died February 16, 2005 in Brookline, Massachusetts.
    
                                                                            Dan Duffield
 
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Class Notes for March 23, 2005
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

               COUPLES ABROAD.  Two couples took time to send photos [print edition only] back from trips abroad last year.  In the upper shot, we see Murrell and Matt Werth taking a break from a stroll through a Swiss city Matt failed to identify (Berne perhaps?).  In the lower photo is the distinguished member of the Federal Trade Commission, Tom Leary, and his wife, Stephanie.  At the time, the Learys were on a 50th anniversary cruise to the west coast of Mexico accompanied by children, spouses, and grandchildren, about a dozen in all.  Tom's note says his six-year term as a Commissioner ends in September.

               MOVES.  Seeking smaller, more manageable quarters or for health reasons, four classmates made moves last year.  Dottie and Hale Bradt moved to a condo in Salem, Massachusetts.  Dodie and Dave Freeman chose a garden apartment in Middle Island, New York, close to two children and their families.  Sara and Jim Rockwell found a continuing care community in Medford, Oregon where help is available for Sara, who had major surgery on her back four years ago.  George Young decided that "advancing years and declining health" required a move to an assisted living facility in Lenox, Massachusetts.

               THANKS.  By now, you will have our excellent, new class directory.  The next time you see Bob Lamperti, congratulate him for his dedication and diligence in publishing this vital class document.
                                                                               Dan Duffield
 
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Class Notes for March 9, 2005
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

               INTERPLANETARY AWARD.  Our classmate Tim Mutch died almost 25 years ago.  His memorial in this publication reviewed his distinguished career as a geology professor at Brown and then associate administrator for space science at NASA.  Now, thanks to Jay Sherrerd, we learn that shortly after his death, NASA bestowed on Tim a unique honor.  In his last major project for the space agency, Tim headed the team that designed and operated the cameras mounted on the Viking I spacecraft, the first to land on and send back images of Mars.  In 1981, NASA renamed the Viking, still standing on the surface of Mars, the "Thomas A. Mutch Memorial Station" and prepared a bronze plaque to that effect.  In our era, it took less than 66 years to progress from the Wright brothers' 50-yard flight at Kitty Hawk to a man setting foot on the moon.  It is not inconceivable that, in this century, a U.S. astronaut on Mars will affix Tim's plaque to the old Viking spacecraft.

               GOOD CITIZENS.  On opposite sides of the Atlantic, two classmates have helped their communities find productive uses for old buildings.  In the Bonn suburb where he lives, Reinhard Loosch heads a private group that has reopened and expanded a public library once closed by local government for lack of funds.  In Fairfield County, Connecticut, according to an item sent in by Cliff Barr, an old movie theater in Darien is being renovated to accommodate two smaller theaters and three upscale businesses while preserving the building's eighty-year-old exterior.  The project, a collaboration between Art Collins and a local realtor, is hailed by residents as a key to the revitalization of the town center.  Art's previous efforts in civic renovation include the makeover of Princeton's Palmer Square some 20 years ago.

                                                                                Dan Duffield

 
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Class Notes for February 23, 2005
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


               GENERATIONS.  Perspectives change for classmates contemplating their fifty-third reunion.  When asked to recount highlights of the past year in a note to accompany class dues payment or Annual Giving donation, many focus on family, especially grandchildren. In ascending order of age, we have Banks Anderson reporting the recent arrival of his eleventh grandchild; Ansel Gould attending our fifty-second with daughter ('79) and granddaughter (prospective '19); and Reinhard Loosch enjoying the company of his three grandchildren, ages nine, six and two, who live near his home in Bonn, Germany.  Some grandkids are college students, Banks Anderson's eldest a Duke freshman and Dom Telesco's granddaughter a Princeton sophomore.   Then, following in grandfather's footsteps, are young entrepreneurs like John Sprague's oldest grandson, co-founder of a computer software firm.  Finally, a few classmates have achieved the elevated status of great-grandfather, most recently Roger Kirk in November, 2004.

               IMPROVING RELATIONS.  Two classmates tried to show the French the benign aspects of modern America.  Don Jack rode on an eight-day bike trip through Provence.  The most challenging leg was the ride to the top of Mt. Ventura, 6200 feet up, and described by Tour de France champion Lance Armstrong as the toughest climb in France.  The champ needs fifty-odd minutes for the climb.  Don's group took four and one-half hours.  Mike Ely, former diplomat, was a guest of the city of Reims, champagne capital of France, for the sixtieth anniversary of the city's liberation by U.S. forces in World War II.  Mike reported that the occasion provided "fine festivities, lots of good bubbly, (and) a splendid parade".  He concluded that U.S.-French relations in Reims "are just fine".

               REQUIESCAT. Warren McCabe reported that Bob Janover died January 7, 2005, in Royal Oak, Michigan.
                                                                                                       Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for February 9, 2005
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

               NUPTIALSCliff Barr reported that Art Collins married Ann Coulter on November 23, 2004 in the Cathedral of St. John the Divine on Manhattan's upper West Side.  The Right Reverend E. Don Taylor of the Episcopal Diocese of New York, an old friend of Art's, officiated at the cathedral's high altar.  The photo [watch for your next issue of the PAW for it] shows the happy couple with Bishop Taylor immediately after the ceremony.

               Two other classmates, who recently became widowers, reported their remarriages in the past year.  Frank Peard and Bill Ragland are the new bridegrooms.

               IRAQI ELECTION.  The outcome of the Iraqi election is unknowable at this writing, but the importance of the event to Iraq and the United States is manifest.  Bud Gillette called at Christmastime to say, with understandable pride, that his sons, Bruce and Christopher, are both heavily involved in different aspects of the election.  Bruce, an Army Reserve LtCol, is in a civil affairs group directly supporting Iraqi election officials.  Christopher, a longtime Associated Press correspondent and bureau chief, has been assigned to manage coverage of the entire election process from AP's Baghdad bureau.  Princeton in the nation's service even unto the second generation.

               ALUMNI DAY 2005.  As usual, Alumni Day on Saturday, February 26, will feature faculty forums and lectures by distinguished visitors and alumni.  The highlight is the alumni luncheon in Jadwin gym followed by the Service of Remembrance in the Chapel.  Of special interest, the speaker at our class dinner Saturday evening will be University Provost Christopher L. Eisgruber.

               REQUIESCAT.  The Class has learned that Ray McGill died on October 23, 2004 in Baltimore. 
                                                                                Dan Duffield
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Class Notes for January 26, 2005
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


               ALL ABOUT BOOKS.  Seven classmates who published in 2004 range from a professional writer to academics to regular folks who had something they wanted to say.

              "PRO" AS IN PROLIFIC.  George Garrett has written or edited nearly 50 books.  In 2004, he published two works of fiction - a "chap book" (really a long short story) and a novel entitled Double Vision.  The former combines personal history and historic events.  As for the latter, a review in the Richmond Times-Dispatch noted that Double Vision "could have been written only by a poet such as Garrett".

              FROM ACADEME.  Four classmates turned out erudite works.  Hale Bradt continued to explain astronomy to laymen with Astro-physical Processes.  Al Gilgen and his wife, Carol, were coauthors of Basics of Psychology, the latest of a series of psychology texts they have written.  Ed Tiryakian paused from his lecturing and travel to co-edit Rethinking Civilizational Analysis.  The undisputed heavyweight is George Newlin, whose anthology entitled Everyone and Everything in Trollope runs three and one-half million words and some 4000 pages in four volumes.

              MY STORY.  Unconventional but fascinating are two self-published works from Fred Schumacher and Caroline and Paul Lindsay.  As his title suggests, Fred has hunted big game On the Trail from the Arctic to the Indian Ocean.  His monograph will appeal to those stirred by outdoor adventure in exotic locales.  Completely different, the Lindsays' publication uses informal photographs to trace their lives from the time they met through their joint ministry over the next half-century.  Interspersed with the pictures are the lyrics of 43 songs that have defined the lives of their family and friends -- everything from Bridge over Troubled Waters to Take Me Out to the Ballgame.

              REQUIESCAT.  Family and friends advised the Class that George Mather died September 30, 2004 in Fort Wayne, Indiana.
                                                                                  Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for December 8, 2004
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

               HARVARD GAME WEEKEND.  On October 22-23, some three dozen classmates attended the game and/or associated Class activities.  Friday evening, Bill and Mary Murdoch hosted their now-traditional pre-game dinner.  Classmates enjoyed a marvelous meal, as usual, and the opportunity to exchange summer news items.  Saturday, those heading for the game gathered in Jadwin Gym for a picnic lunch sponsored by the Alumni Council.  Then off to the game, which resembled Custer's Last Stand without the horses - in short, an overwhelming Cantab victory.  Thanks to clear-sighted planning, survivors of the game had a chance to recover at a joint '52-'72 cocktail party at the impressive new Carl Icahn Laboratory.  Set aside the game, and it was a great weekend enjoyed by all and especially Al Gonzalez, who came all the way from his home in Costa Rica to join us.  (N.B. The Secretary is indebted to Joe Bolster for his comprehensive account of the weekend's proceedings.)

               MINI XX.  On Harvard weekend, Walt Culin briefed class leaders on Mini-Reunion XX scheduled for March 31-April 3, 2005 in Savannah, Georgia.  Responding to an early mailing, almost 100 classmates have stated they are planning or likely to attend.  The venue is one of America's oldest and most colorful cities, promising an interesting and convivial Mini XX.

               HORSEMEN AT LARGE.  Our distinguished cavalry troop, Chips Chester, Art Collins, and Bob Jiranek saddled up and toured the beautiful Italian region of Tuscany last spring.  Chips characterized this trip as the most luxurious of those undertaken by the dauntless trio.  From their quarters in an estate near Siena, they sallied forth to explore the countryside.  They also made time to visit Doug Gorham, a longtime resident of Florence.  A memorable addition to their other journeys to six continents.  For a full account of their trip, see the Class web site [click here].
                                                                           Dan Duffield

 
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Class Notes for October 20, 2004
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

               TARHEEL TIGERS.  For the past five years, alumni in North Carolina's Sandhills area (Pinehurst) have gathered for dinner each spring.  FUZZY NEVILLE is one of the local organizers and always passes along a '52 attendance roster.  Shown here before dinner are, left to right: BOB EBY, Patricia EVANS (widow of McNair Evans), Pamela Neville, BURT WEISS, and Fuzzy.

               FOREIGN AFFAIRS.  Class members continue to add to the luster of our record in foreign affairs in important, if somewhat prosaic, ways.  For several years since his retirement, MIKE ELY has been sorting through the monumental stacks of State Department communications.  His goal: to find the documents worth keeping for the archival record to ensure their accuracy and completeness and dispose of the rest.  Then from Michigan, we learn from GIL BOGLEY that DON OBERDORFER addressed the International Affairs Forum in Traverse City on the subject of the two Koreas, with emphasis on the nuclear threat from North Korea.  In Gil's words, "'52 wows 'em again!"

               EUROPEAN UNION.  The effort to integrate the European nations has proceeded on several levels with a couple of classmates playing important roles.  At the technical level, REINHARD LOOSCH has been active in development of European space policy following a career in this field.  Meanwhile, WIM VAN EEKELEN took part as a Netherlands representative in the landmark task of writing a European constitution.   Wim's comment on the process: "It seemed a good compromise...(but) your ancestors did better in Philadelphia."

                                                                               Dan Duffield
 
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Class Notes for July 7, 2004

(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


           MERRY MONTH.  May 2004 featured Mini XIX in Arizona, dedication of the Andlinger Center, and our 52nd Reunion.

           MINI XIX.  TED NICHOLSON, HOBEY HENDERSON, and BILL NICELY put together a great mini-reunion in Scottsdale, Arizona and environs May 2-5.  A contingent of 37 classmates and 39 wives, friends and class associates sampled local lifestyle and cuisine amid spectacular scenery.  About half the group stayed an additional 48 hours to visit the Grand Canyon and nearby attractions.  Ted reported that his host group enjoyed making the event memorable while showing off the best of Arizona.  (For details, see DON OBERDORFER's report on the 1952 web page.)  [Click here for Don's report.]

           ANDLINGER CENTER.  Honorary classmate SHIRLEY TILGHMAN presided at the May 14 dedication of the Andlinger Center for the Humanities.  The new facility, occupying the renovated East Pyne-Chancellor Green-Henry House complex, is the result of GERRY ANDLINGER's extraordinary gift to the University.  GEORGE NEWLIN reported that Gerry's emotional address evoked his days as an impoverished undergraduate far from his native Austria.  Other classmates present included JOE BOLSTER, BOB EBY, DICK PIVIROTTO, and JAY SHERRERD.
 


Receiving the Award for the Class


           OUR FIFTY-SECOND.  Twenty-six classmates plus wives and friends gathered for our 52nd Reunion May 28 & 29.  At the Alumni Council awards luncheon on Friday, class president HAL SAUNDERS and vice-president STEVE ROGERS accepted two trophies for the number and percentage of classmates attending Mini XVIII in Washington, D.C. in May 2003 (96 class members or about 15 percent of the class roll).  Friday evening, about three dozen assembled for dinner at the home of MARY and BILL MURDOCH.   Saturday, glorious weather set off the unmatched spectacle of the P-rade.  The 1952 detachment stood out with our gonfalon banners, carried by Joe Bolster, CHARLIE HARPER, and BARRY LOPER, and our striped jackets which elicited cheers from younger classes.  (Joe Bolster and Steve Rogers contributed to this report.)

                                                                       
                                                                            Dan Duffield
 
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Our Class Secretary with the Princeton Shell bearing his name

Dan Duffield speaking to the assembled dignitaries

Dignitaries listening intently to Dan

Roger & Latie with Dan

Class Notes for June 9, 2004
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

           Stand-in reporter GEORGE NEWLIN filed this:

           Early in March EDGAR M. MASINTER and John C. Beck, ’53, invited us to the Shea Rowing Center for the christening on April 30 of a brand-new heavyweight shell to be named for DAN DUFFIELD, “to honor Dan,” said the letter, “for his exemplary and unselfish contributions to our country, Princeton and Princeton rowing.”

           Thrilled at so signal an honor of an exemplary and beloved classmate, we showed up to find JOE BOLSTER (with Tink), JOHN EMERY (with B. J.), PHIL HILL, JOHN LAUPHEIMER, ED MASINTER (with Margery), ROGER McLEAN (with Latie), HAL SAUNDERS and JAY SHERRERD (with Kathy), on the ramp next to the Boathouse.  Six vintage oarsmen present from other classes had rowed with Dan.  The 2004 heavyweight crew stood at parade rest beside a gurney holding a gorgeous 8-oar rowing shell, pristinely gleaming in the evening sun, sleek and dangerous as Triton’s lance.

           Dead on 6 pm, co-donor and host ED MASINTER, varsity coxswain 1950-52, took the mike and saluted DAN’s lifetime of military service to his country, and his commitment to rowing and passionate will to win, rewarded with near-victorious performances at the 1952 IRA Regatta and the Olympic Trials, still vividly remembered “with pride and pain.”  (The winning Navy boat later took the Olympic gold.)  DAN spoke of “oarsmen,” love, and the Marines with wit, pith and moment, and a moment later poured champagne over the shell’s bow, briefly inundating his name.

           We moved inside for drinks and a magnificent dinner, courtesy of Messrs Beck and MASINTER, and adjourned exultant at this further proof of the greatness of ’52.

 
                                                George Newlin, for Dan Duffield
 
           Watch for the PAW print edition of the Class Note in the PAW, with photo of Ed, John and Dan.

 
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Class Notes for May 12, 2004
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

           ON THE TRAIL.  Four classmates saw the countryside abroad using old-fashioned transportation.  On horseback were the three '52 troopers, Chips Chester, Art Collins, and Bob Jiranek, who explored what Chips called the "moonscape" of Iceland. Rough duty - 15 travelers per room and no bathing except in frigid mountain streams or hot springs.  Al West walked, but in the civilized precincts of southwest England.  He described his two-week journey as blessed by "beautiful weather (and) beautiful scenery".

           FAMILY NOTES.  Dave Rowley, a widower since 2000, writes that he married Sharron Heller last June.  He calls it "great to be a newlywed".  Don Kahn celebrated his 73rd birthday last August by gathering his entire clan - eleven in all - at a beach house on the Jersey shore. A birthday gift to Don from the family was a successful day of deep-sea fishing.

           POST-RETIREMENT MOVES.  Suie and John McShane report that they moved last September to Broadmead, a retirement community in Cockeysville, Maryland.  This winter, Dave Freeman moved into a similar situation in Middle Island, New York.

           HEALTH ISSUES.  "Older age" affects every one physically, but in different ways.  Chips Chester had to have a knee replaced last November.  Jack Blessing says his tennis game is "as good - or bad - as before" after surgery last year to repair one heart valve and replace another.  Tom Daubert reports feeling "passable" after hospitalization for "pneumonia, congestive heart failure, and a 'very mild' heart attack".   (The betting is that Tom will be at Reunions, as usual, and will traverse the P-rade route on foot or by golf cart.)  And a philosophical insight from Don Jack who writes, "At our age, no news is good news."  Amen to that.

           REQUIESCAT.  Jerry Canter and Alex Mills each reported that Dave Allen died March 24 in Chicago.

                                                                           Dan Duffield


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Class Notes for April 21, 2004
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

 

           YOUNG TIGERS.  Two classmates report with pride about grandchildren now on campus. Will Garwood says that granddaughter Laura Garwood ’07 joined her brother Will Garwood, III ’05 as a third-generation Princetonian.  Their parents, Will Garwood, Jr. and his wife, Deborah, are both class of ’79.  Dom Telesco’s ebullient note says it all: "At last, granddaughter Chloe Wohlforth (ed: Dom's eldest) class of ’07.  First of the Telesco clan to make it to Princeton!!"  Dom apparently forgot to count himself as a member of the "Telesco clan".

           THIS SIDE OF THE WATER.  Classmates with wanderlust have ventured across the seas, even as far as Antarctica. Others try attractions closer to home, such as Alaska and the Panama Canal.  Heading north last summer were Sam Pringle and his family for an Alaskan vacation Sam called "our best ever".  Margy and Sandy Zabriskie spent their anniversary at Alaska's famed Denali National Park, which they termed "glorious".  As a bonus, they were in the delivery room of an Anchorage hospital to watch the birth of their eleventh grandchild.  Heading south to transit the canal were Sara and Jim Rockwell.  They were particularly interested in their first look at Guatemala during a port call enroute.  Never mind frost; when snow covered the pumpkin in Nebraska late last fall, Omaha residents Lannie and Larry McNichols found the lure of the tropics irresistable.  They too embarked on a Panama Canal cruise looking to escape the onset of winter.

           FAREWELL Tom Dosdall called to report that Wally Friend died February 29 in Palm Desert, California.  Later, Roger Berlind notified us that seven classmates attended Wally's funeral on March 8 in Indian Wells, California.  In addition to Roger, those from ’52 on hand included Art Christensen, Tom Dosdall, Alf Gardner, John Lowry, Jay Master, and Paul Mueller.

                                                                           Dan Duffield


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Class Notes for April 7, 2004
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

           ALUMNI DAY.   Princeton's annual mid-winter Alumni Day fell on Saturday, February 21.  A class contingent of about 30 began the weekend with the customary Friday night dinner at the home of Mary and Bill Murdoch.  On Saturday, the Alumni Association lunch in Jadwin Gym drew about 1200 alumni and guests who applauded the traditional awards to distinguished alumni and graduate and undergraduate students.  Then there were Annual Giving awards, among them the Harold Helm Award for lifetime achievement on behalf of Annual Giving.     The award this year cited Joe Bolster for his 24 years as Director of Annual Giving as well as for his leadership in class Annual Giving campaigns.   The presenter admitted that he did not know why it took so long for the University to recognize Joe.   By midafternoon, alumni had assembled in the University Chapel for the Service of Remembrance.  Our vice president, Steve Rogers, represented us in the procession of classes as we honored the 13 classmates who died in 2003.  After the class dinner at the Friend Center, president Hal Saunders introduced our speaker, University vice president and secretary, Robert Durkee.  Articulate and formidably well-informed, Mr. Durkee presented a survey of programs designed to move the University toward an ever more productive future.

            MINI IN THE DESERT.  Ted Nicholson reports all systems go for Mini XIX, May 2-5 in Scottsdale, Arizona.  Ted is looking for about 100 to attend.  The organizers have planned a two-day total immersion in the culture and environment of the desert Southwest, even including a gold-panning session.    The climax is a class dinner at the Heard Museum, renowned for its preeminent collection of American Indian artifacts.   Classmates who missed the March 15 reservation deadline should contact Ted at (480)951-1897 or ted@nicholsoncompany.com.  His promise is to bend every effort to accommodate late-comers.

                                                                           Dan Duffield


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Class Notes for March 24, 2004
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

           BEST FRIENDS. Stokes Carrigan described Sam Ewing's funeral on February 5.  His letter follows herewith:

A short note re Sam Ewing's funeral.
It was held in the Valley Forge Chapel, and it was packed solidly - wall to wall and out the door.  Classmates attending included Charlie Schaefer, who briefly described Sam's Princeton experience and something of his accomplishments as President of the Phila. Kennel Club, George Aman, Harry Jeanes, his roommate senior year, and myself.     Sam was a world-renowned breeder of Irish Wolfhounds.  At the interment of his ashes in the churchyard there were nine Irish Wolfhounds present.

           AWARD.  The trustees of Phillips Academy, Andover last October selected Roger McLean as one of five recipients of Andover's Distinguished Service Award for 2003.  Roger was cited for editing the class of 1948 50th reunion book, which drew 83 percent participation and was a key factor in recording a reunion attendance record.  As class president, Roger oversaw the 55th reunion, which also set Andover attendance and giving records.

           STAYING ACTIVE.  Classmates report various post-career activities.  Diane and Stokes Carrigan continued their management and consulting practice, and started a tutoring referral service.  Mark Crane now heads the Executive Service of Chicago offering management advice to area non-profits.  Bob Doherty is with the North Carolina Symphony.  During vacations last year, he fished the Bahamas and Idaho’s Snake River.  Jim Davis reported that Chuck Devoe was a finalist in singles and doubles at the National Men's 70's Grass Court Championships.  A former age-group champion, Chuck had to settle for second in both championships.  Dick Riordan is now secretary of education in the administration of California’s new "Governator", Arnold Schwarzenegger.  In elective politics, Bill MacIlvaine won a second term on the Naples (Florida) City Council by 21 votes of some 7700 cast. 
                                                                            Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for March 10, 2004
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


           DISTINCTION.  In his career as an architect, Coke Florance has designed large commercial structures across the country and overseas with a skill that has earned him professional awards.  But in a recent note, he displayed the enthusiasm of a new architect with his first commission.  All because of a visitors' center he has been asked to design - a huge reduction in scale compared to his MCI Center in Washington, D.C.  Reading further, we learn that the location and purpose of the building are what have fired up Coke.  The center will serve the American cemetery in Normandy and overlook the now-legendary D-day landing beaches.  Our salute to a distinguished classmate who will leave a tangible mark on history.

           PERAMBULATING.  Last year was typical for Ed Tiryakian.  A couple of months after he and Josefina celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary, Ed was on the road again.  For the first time, he went to the Middle East, visiting Lebanon, Jordan and Israel while resisting a fleeting temptation to see Baghdad.  Just before Christmas, he flew to Seoul, Korea to deliver the keynote speech to a forum addressing global environmental problems.  Finishing his travel for 2003, he flew home for the holidays.

           BARR CAR.  Cliff Barr couldn't resist this mint-condition MG, especially because it is a 1952 model, a nearly perfect match to the MG he owned nearly five decades ago.   [Watch for the photo in the print edition of the Class Notes.]

           REQUIESCAT. Charlie Schaefer reported that Sam Ewing died February 1, 2004, in Devon, Pennsylvania. 
                                                                          Dan Duffield
 
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Class Notes for February 25, 2004
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

           ENCOUNTERS I.  Among classmates who got together last summer was Dave Smith, whose trip to California included a stop in Fullerton to see Penny and Herb Milligan.   Traveling a shorter distance, Betsy and Phil McMaster enjoyed dinner at the Maine summer home of Jaeki and Irv Cohen. Our class contingent in Chattanooga, Tennessee has exactly two members, Olan Mills and Bill Ragland.  These two found themselves on opposite sides of the aisle at the wedding of Olan's son, Brent, to Bill's daughter, Julie.
           
            ENCOUNTERS II.
 Along with planned meetings of classmates, we learned of two that were unexpected. Jay Sherrerd walked into the dining room at the Princeton Club of New York and was surprised to see Doug Gorham.  Doug, a longtime resident of Florence, Italy, rarely returns to the U.S. but has been a hospitable host to classmates who have visited him at home.  With this in mind, Jay spent much of their breakfast meeting urging Doug to join the class for our 55th reunion.  Then, an astounding coincidence involved Joe Bolster and Darby Houston.  Both live in the Princeton area, no more than a local phone call apart.  Last fall, Joe, his wife, Tink, and son, Tom, left Princeton before dawn and headed for a family reunion in Cleveland.  After a few hours, they decided to drive into a Pennsylvania Turnpike service area for gas and a bite to eat. As they pulled up to the pump, Joe realized that the person ahead of him was Darby.  Turns out the Houstons left Princeton, also bound for Cleveland, a few minutes ahead of the Bolsters and decided en route to stop at the service area where the Bolsters arrived five minutes later.  We'll leave it to the statisticians among us to compute the odds against this meeting.

                                                                                         
                                                                           Dan Duffield
 

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Class Notes for February 11, 2004
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


           FROM THE PUBLISHERS. Classmates have been keeping publishers busy. George Garrett, with some 55 books written or edited, has put together Southern Excursions, a compilation of essays about Southern writers. Patty and Bud Foulke have collaborated on eleven travel guides, the most recent covering the Champlain and Hudson Valleys. Don Oberdorfer's fifth book is a monumental biography of the late Senator (and Ambassador) Mike Mansfield (see following Note). Max ter Horst, professor of comparative literature at the University of Rochester, last spring published his second book of criticism, The Fortunes of the Novel. Retiring from full-time teaching at M.I.T. gave Hale Bradt the opportunity to publish his first book, Astronomy Methods: A Physical Approach to Astronomical Observations. Still to come in 2004 is micro-scholarship from George Newlin wrapping up his four-volume Trollope anthology. Former Penn. history professor, Jim Davis, will publish his macro-scholarship effort, The Human Story, described by the author as "a history of everything from the fall of man to the rise of our national debt" in a single volume.
          

           BOOK SIGNING. Last October, in Washington, D.C., the Johns Hopkins School for Advanced International Studies hosted a reception and book signing for Don Oberdorfer to mark publication of his Mansfield biography. Barry Loper reported that a panel discussion before the reception disclosed that the Senator never "authorized" his biography but did grant Don 32 interviews. The class contingent on hand for the evening included Chips Chester, Roger Kirk, Jean and Barry Loper, Helene and Quincey Lumsden, Phyllis and Bob Oakley, Kent and Steve Rogers, Carol Saunders, and Clara and George Towner.

          REQUIESCANT. The class learned that Bill Hansen died November 21, 2003 in Roanoke, Virginia; Chester Bell died December 13, 2003 in Washington, D.C.; and John Hagaman died December 15, 2003, in Glen Ridge, New Jersey.
  
                                                                                              Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for January 28, 2004
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


             FAREWELLS.  Duke Dennen's funeral took place at St. Elizabeth's Roman Catholic Church in Wyckoff, New Jersey on October 20, 2003.  Classmates on hand for the funeral or the viewing the previous evening included honorary pallbearer John McGillicuddy as well as Bob Diefenbach, John Emery, Punchy Kline, Hoby Kreitler, John Laupheimer, and Dick Pivirotto. (Thanks to Messrs. Emery and Laupheimer for their accounts of this event.)

             TROUBADOUR.  Last July, George Newlin went on the road for what must have been a nearly perfect summer vacation.  His odyssey took him first to the Adirondacks of upper New York state, where he was a guest of Mac Fish's family and gave a Gershwin recital as part of a concert honoring Mac's memory.  Next on the list of classmates visited were Louisa and Mike Kennedy at their home on Mount Desert Island on the Maine coast.   Then to Connecticut where he visited Adela and Lucius Wilmerding in Old Lyme and John Moore in Greenwich. At each stop, George rewarded his hosts' hospitality by playing the Gershwin recital.

             MEDICAL MIRACLES.  Two classmates share the distinction of being the first in our class to receive heart transplants.  John LaGrua had the operation last summer.  A layman, John found it "overwhelming...that a miracle has indeed occurred.”  Frank Sparrow, a physician, was the calm professional, describing the operation in September as "successful" and his recovery at home uneventful.  Frank's perspective is understandable, but we tend to agree with John that a heart transplant is indeed a miracle.  Regardless, we can be grateful for any medical breakthrough that restores the vigor of our classmates.

             REQUIESCANT.  The class has learned that Peter Sunsitter died June 3, 2003 in Cave Junction, Oregon.  (As an undergraduate, Peter went by the name of James McCoy.)  Also, Charles Lafean died June 20, 2003, in Lewiston, Maine.

                                                                                                             Dan Duffield

 
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Class Notes for December 17, 2003
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

        ACCLAIMED.  Despite Jay Sherrerd's significant achievements in behalf of Princeton, praise for his efforts makes him uncomfortable.  With his reluctant approval, we can report that the Princeton Varsity Club, at its annual banquet last spring, presented Jay with its Award of Merit.  The citation stated that Jay "has given as much time and support to Princeton as anyone during the last half-century" and, at the same time, recognized his "understated way and reluctance to draw attention to himself".  The class follows the Varsity Club's lead with enthusiastic applause for a valued friend and classmate.

           JUST IN TIME.  Last spring, after complaining of shortness of breath, Bob Middlebrook received an emergency implant of a so-called "coated stent" that releases a drug into the arteries to inhibit formation of scar tissue.  Bob's timing was impeccable.  The stent had only been approved for use a week earlier.  Delaying the operation one week might have been fatal.  We learned of this miracle from Warren McCabe, who spotted Bob's name in a Barron's article about recent advances in medical technology.

           RETIREMENT PLUS.  Various classmates decided that retirement means staying busy. George Knebel left the securities business at the end of last year.  His first thought was to spend more time with his seven grandchildren.  Dave Freeman works part-time as a CPA after selling his practice nine years ago.  For the rest, he does "pro bono" work for friends, relatives and local charities.  Retired English professor Bud Foulke lectures on maritime literature, most recently at the National Maritime Museum in London.  Chuck Saunders became a serious cyclist and recently averaged 14 mph over a hilly 31-mile course near Albuquerque, New Mexico.

           REQUIESCAT.  John Emery reported that Dick Dennen died on October 15, 2003 in Wyckoff, New Jersey.

                                                                                                             Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for November 19, 2003
(edited from text submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

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 AT THE PODIUM.  Business leaders, academics and policy wonks crowd the hall to
listen to former Secretary of State Jim Baker.  But, as two classmates report, Jim is happy to speak to less high-powered groups in settings as diverse as Pottstown, Pennsylvania and Traverse City, Michigan.  Jay Sherrerd reports that Jim addressed the students at The Hill School in Pennsylvania last March.  A 1948 graduate from The Hill, Jim received the 2003 Sixth Form Leadership Award.  Much of his speech dealt with current events in the Middle East, but he took care to describe his days at the school and relate how lessons learned there helped him in his career.  Jim urged the students to “go forth from this school and be leaders.”  Some 10 weeks later, in mid-June, Jim responded to an invitation from Gil Bogley, his freshman tennis teammate, to address an international affairs forum in Gil's Michigan home town.  Gil's three-word review of the speech: “He wowed 'em!”

             CIVIC VIRTUE.  Two classmates contributing to their communities are Bill MacIlvaine and Bob Warren.  Bill moved to Naples, Florida a dozen years ago and stayed put after retirement in 1998.  After heading a commission to plan the renovation of the city's downtown, Bill was elected to the city council and soon had to push for a favorable vote on the plan he helped develop.  In Suffield, Connecticut, Bob was one of a group who started the monthly Suffield Observer four years ago.  The paper is remarkable because it is delivered free to the whole town, limits advertising to one-third of its page count, and is put together by unpaid volunteers.  Withal, the Observer remains true to the group's purpose "to build a sense of community" and has been the subject of a favorable review in The New York Times.

                                                                                                             Dan Duffield

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 Class Notes for November 5, 2003
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

HONORS.  Classmates were honored in two different venues. Radnor Township, Pennsylvania held its traditional Memorial Day parade featuring bands, scouts (boy and girl), civic groups, fire engines, classic cars, and local politicians.  As co-grand marshals, the parade committee chose Ellen and George Aman in honor of their long years of service in township government.  Meanwhile, Kent School (Connecticut) honored a former trustee and member of its athletic hall of fame by inviting Art Collins to be principal speaker at its Prize Day ceremony.  For Art, perhaps the most important person in the audience was granddaughter Morgan, a Kent sophomore.

            FAMILY MATTERS.  Mal Cleland now counts four great-grandchildren, three of them born in 2002.  Fred Mann's wife, Kitty, is a founding trustee of Sonoma Academy (California) , a new private school one-third of whose students receive scholarships.  Ben Moore presides over a clan with 17 grandchildren at last count.  Mal Powell’s two daughters were winners in the college admissions steeplechase, but only one, Holly '06, chose Princeton.  Daughter Heather picked up her Harvard degree in June.  Dan Wilkes, who has been there, done that, and has the Ph.D. to prove it, announced with some relief and great pride that son George had his dissertation accepted and would soon be the second "Dr. Wilkes".

            YALE GAME.  The 2003 meeting in this ancient rivalry begins at 1:00 PM Saturday, November 15 in Princeton Stadium.  There is still time to plan on joining classmates before the game at the tailgate luncheon in Jadwin Gym.  After the game, stop in at the class party in the new Icahn Laboratory Washington Road across from the stadium.

             REQUIESCANT.  From Bill Murdoch we have learned that Russell Barnhart died September 14, 2003 in Queens, New York.  Bob Lovell advised that Pete Pursel died September 18, 2003 in Detroit, Michigan.

                                                                                                              Dan Duffield

Class Notes for October 22, 2003
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

            CURTAIN GOING UP.  Chalk up another theatrical triumph for Roger Berlind.  Our classmate, with more Tony awards than any producer in Broadway's history, was guest of honor at his newest opening September 8.  This time the opening wasn't a new show; it was a new theater with his name emblazoned above the entrance.

            Five years ago, Roger parlayed his love of the theater and generosity to Princeton in a proposal to sponsor a 380-seat theater to be built as an extension of McCarter Theater.  He offered to pay a quarter of the cost with the University and the McCarter Theater Company (an independent community theater and sole owner of the building since 1973) making equal contritributions to cover the remainder.  The new venue would then be shared by the theater company and Princeton's Program in Theater and Dance.  Almost 1600 donors eventually supported the project.  Among the most generous were classmates Wally Friend and Bob Lovell. Pete and Landon Peters also made a substantial gift.

            At the opening ceremony in the new theater, the directors of the University's theater program and the McCarter company were both especially eloquent in explaining how their respective programs will flourish in the new facility.  After them, Roger spoke, low-keyed and modest as usual.  Even so, he admitted he was thrilled to see his name above the entrance and then apologized for, as he described it, his "streak of 'Trumpish-ness'.”  The capacity audience saluted his vision, generosity and effort with a standing ovation.  Joining in from their front-row seats were Roger's wife, Brooke, and his son, William.

            Also on hand at the curtain-raising and dinner afterward at Lowrie House, the official residence of University President Shirley Tilghman, were classmates Bob Lovell, Mary and Bill Murdoch and Dan Duffield.

                                                                                                              Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for October 8, 2003
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


              KUDOS.   Scheduled for early October, the University of Tennessee's southern Literature Festival has as its theme "A Celebration of the Life and Work of George Garrett.”  The festival brochure describes the volume and quality of George's work in "every (literary) genre" and his career as a teacher and mentor of young writers.  From Hawaii comes word that Doc Buyers’ business success and loyalty to the Republican Party has been acknowledged by the GOP’s Business Advisory Council.  The group picked Doc as one of 12 "Businessmen of the Year" for 2003.

             VOCATIONS, ETC.   Three classmates reported current efforts to stay active and make a contribution.  Bill Gough is now Chairman of the Board of the Foundation for Mind-Being Research which he helped found over 20 years ago.  Bob Jiranek is building an equestrian center in his home town of Danville, Virginia.  The facility will provide training for handicapped children and support the equestrian program at a local college.  Bob Bell writes that retired judges "mediate, arbitrate, or vegetate".  After a career as a Kansas district judge, Bob chose arbitration.  But so far, he has found it slow going and not yet a viable option to vegetating.

              HARVARD GAME.  Classmates who plan to be in Boston on October 25 to watch the Tiger football team take on Harvard should eschew fast food and stadium concessions in favor of the Tiger Tent.  Erected just outside Harvard Stadium, the tent shelters class tables and a pay-as-you-go buffet luncheon featuring genuine New England clam chowder.  Come early, find the '52 contingent, and enjoy good company and a pleasant meal before the game.

               REQUIESCAT.  The class has learned that Stephen Seidel died in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on July 21, 2003.

                                                                                                               Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for September 10, 2003
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)


             ANNUAL GIVING.  Our Annual Giving honcho, Don Malehorn, declared that '52 had done pretty well in the 2002-03 campaign.  The Class contributed $431,793 or 96% of our quota assigned by the University.  Even though we were just short of that goal, we led all off-year reunion classes.  Our participation rate with 480 donors was 78.4% against a goal of 80% -10 more givers.  Here again, we fell short of an ambitious goal but were ahead of every post-WW II class save one, which was only a few hundredths of a percentage point ahead of us.  As he does every year, Don stressed the dedication and effectiveness of the Class AG organization of about five dozen people managed by a committee headed by Don and consisting of long-time members Joe Bolster, John Emery, Dick Pivirotto, and Jay Sherrerd.  In a tough year for fund-raising, our AG group once again burnished 1952's outstanding 51-year Annual Giving record.

              IN MEMORIAM.  In May, three deceased members of the Class were honored, two by Princeton and one by St. George's School in Newport, Rhode Island. Bronze stars have long been mounted on dormitory window ledges to commemorate former occupants who died in service during both World Wars.  Now the University has added stars for those who fell during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. Included are Sam Clay and Ed Loeffler, both former residents of Edwards Hall.  Meanwhile, on May 17, St. George's School formally dedicated the Henry C. Tatnall '48 House, a new faculty home.  Sandy Tatnall, an honored guest at the ceremony, reports that the memorial plaque on the front of the house describes Henry as “A kind and generous man."  The Class offers a heartfelt second to that motion.

              REQUIESCAT.  From Jack Blessing we have learned that Joel Henkel died in Hanover, New Hampshire on July 31, 2002.

                                                                                                                 Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for July 2, 2003
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

             REUNIONS 2003.  Our 51st had a modest turnout of 23 classmates who signed in and took part in some or all of the weekend doings.  The first event of interest was the Alumni Association luncheon on Friday.  Along with 1992, the Class was cited for innovations that "expanded the dimension of Reunions" in 2002, chiefly The Daily Princetonian reprints from our undergraduate years.  Mary and Bill Murdoch accepted the award, but Bill made sure we all understood that the "Prince project" depended on the efforts of Gil Bogley, Joe Bolster, and Toby Strachan.  Saturday’s P-rade marchers were exposed throughout to what one participant termed an "Irish drizzle".  Nonetheless, amid our proud contingent of a dozen classmates, Vic Bihl, Joe Bolster, and Stokes Carrigan held high the three "Actus Classicus" gonfalon banners from our 50th.  Moreover, Tom Daubert spurned the golf cart he had to use the past two P-rades and walked the entire route.  Then, to wrap things up in style, the Murdochs hosted dinner for 30, a long-standing and most pleasant off-year reunion tradition.

            ADDENDUM.  Space limits squeezed out an item from the re- port on the Washington, D.C. mini.  On the final evening, Priscilla Hildum described how she and Grace Brush are preparing a compilation of reminiscences from classmates' wives.  The goal is, in effect, to publish a companion volume to The Book of Our History.  First returns are encouraging, but a broader re- sponse is essential to realize the potential value of this endeavor.

           PARDON ME.  Alert readers Kent and Steve Rogers advised that the account of the Washington mini should have read that Liz Atwood's family, not Fred's, donated to the antique American furnishings at the State Department.  Apologies to all concerned.

            REQUIESCATLovett Baker reported that Dudley Sharp died May 14 in Houston, Texas.

                                                                                                                 Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for June 4, 2003
(as submitted to the Princeton Alumni Weekly)

            MARVELOUS MINI.  The Washington, D.C. mini-reunion, or Mini XVIII, on May 1-4, drew 96 classmates, three associates (widows of classmates), and 89 wives, companions and family, a total of 188.  The organizing committee of 22 classmates and their wives was led by Jerry Canter, Barry Loper, Steve Rogers, Hal Saunders, and George Towner.

            KICKOFF.  After registering Thursday at headquarters in the Hotel Washington, we gathered for a drink on the rooftop terrace.  There, freshman roommates Jim Simpson and Dick Kazmaier reminisced about their year at 16 Dickinson St.  We had a marvelous dinner and concert by an ex-Yale Whiffenpoof.  Talking to Peggy and Poss Parham, we learned that their daughter, Tally, had flown combat missions over Iraq..

            SECOND QUARTER.  Friday morning, we heard briefings at the State Department arranged by Phyllis Oakley.  A group viewed the diplomatic reception areas with their priceless antiques, including gifts from the families of Fred Atwood and Lydia Boyer.  That afternoon we were honored, thanks to Skip Nalen, to be greeted at the Supreme Court by Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.  Then, on the riverboat Odyssey, we enjoyed dinner and dancing, admiring the graceful steps of the Coes and Malehorns.

            THIRD QUARTER.    Saturday morning was devoted to a lecture and exhibits at the National Gallery of Art.  Thereafter, one group remained at the gallery while the rest split up to visit various Washington landmarks.  The serious-minded attended a forum entitled Americans' Role in the World.  At dinner at the Old Ebbitt Grill, President Saunders recognized the efforts of the organizing committee, and Ted Nicholson previewed Mini XIX next year in Scottsdale, Arizona.

             FINAL GUN.  Sunday, we had a sumptuous brunch at the Marriott Hotel and made the rounds for final conversations with classmates.  Then it was time to go.  Phil Hill, maitre d' for the brunch, closed the doors, and Mini XVIII was a memory.
                                                                                                                 Dan Duffield

Ed. note: Dan is seriously restricted on the length of his submissions to the PAW.  For the longer report on Mini XVIII that he would have liked to submit, click here.

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Class Notes for May 14, 2003
(as submitted to the Alumni Weekly)

              AUTHORS - ALL KINDS. The flood of books from class authors continues.  Subject matter varies from elegiac poetry to home improvement.  An outfit called White Eagle Coffee Store Press has published Al West's haunting poems about the illness and death of his wife, Emily, in 1999. Bill Gough continues his quest of two decades to define the linkages between science and human personality. He has just co-authored a work entitled The Domain of Unbounded Potential.  Al Gilgen, retired from the faculty of the University of Northern Iowa, has been working on two books on contemporary American psychology.  Larry McNichols heads up a group preparing a history of the Mid-America Council of the Boy Scouts.  The council covers big chunks of Nebraska and Iowa, and research will involve plenty of what Larry calls "windshield time."  Finally, Duncan Stephens has just written and published a book whose title says it all: Home Remodeling Pitfalls and How to Avoid Them. That puppy should fly off the shelves.

               GOOD MOVES.  Likely motives to move are to find quarters more suitable for the "empty nest" or to be closer to the children.  Gloria and Phil May crossed the St. Johns River in Jacksonville, Florida to a high-rise condo.  Now Phil has to figure out how to dispose of his 10,000-volume library.  Sylvia and Harvey Glickman likewise chose a high-rise condo, moving to a nearby town on the Main Line.  Early on in their new digs, they entertained Ralph Simon, who flew in from California to see his college roommate.  Sara and Jeff Wright moved from Provence to an apartment in Paris to be nearer their daughters in Paris and southeast England. Their address, published here at Sara's request: 11, rue Barbet de Jouy, 75007 Paris, France.

              REQUIESCAT. John Clutz reported that Ted Kennedy died Apri17 in Cos Cob, Connecticut.

                                                                                                                   Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for April 23, 2003
(as submitted to the Alumni Weekly)

          HONORS.  Thirty years ago, Dave Paton led a group that developed the Project Orbis "flying eye hospital" - a jetliner loaded with ophthalmological equipment, manned by volunteer surgeons and support staff, and capable of providing advanced eye care at any suitable airport in the world.  Now, George Gowen reports that Orbis celebrated the twentieth anniversary of its first flight by honoring five "founding benefactors".  Among them was Tom Knight, who took time from his career in advertising to serve as first secretary of the organization, set up its administrative structure, and take on a major fundraising role.  Tom and the others were guests of honor at a banquet at The Plaza in New York in February.  On the banquet committee were classmates George Gowen, George Hambleton, John McGillicuddy, and Connie Sidamon-Eristoff.

          "B" AS IN "BUSINESS".  Thanks to a report from Barry Loper, we have learned that Charlie Renfrew, after a distinguished career in law and government, has ventured into the world of professional sports.  Charlie didn't need a "zebra" jersey, but he refereed a dispute between the NBA and the players' union about - what else? - money.  The two parties agreed to accept Charlie's ruling as arbitrator on the complex issues of the luxury tax and associated levies.  The upshot: Charlie found the players out of order and the owners' case clearly supported by the existing labor contract.
 
          REMEMBERING THE FIFTIETH.  Steve Rogers advised that there are still copies for sale at reasonable prices of the special essay book, Fifty Years at Home and Abroad, the reminiscences CD, and the reunion album.  Contact Bob Lamperti for details.  In a related note, Gil Bogley reported that there are at least two dozen extra copies of The Daily Princetonian compilations from 1948-1952.  Contact Gil or Bill Murdoch.

                                                                                                                     Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for April 9, 2003
(as submitted to the Alumni Weekly)

        ALUMNI DAY. The weekend began Friday evening, February 21, with dinner for three dozen at the home of Mary and Bill Murdoch. The next day, at the Alumni Council luncheon in Jadwin Gym, we had a chance to applaud the class as well as the awesome achievements of award-winning students and alumni. 1952 was cited for last year's record-breaking Annual Giving campaign under Don Malehorn's leadership as class agent. Regional awards included one for Houston, Texas, where Dave Smith was Annual Giving chairman. Later, at the Service of Remembrance in the Chapel, Princetonians who died in 2002 were honored, including 11 classmates. Barbara and Bruce Coe hosted the class dinner at the Friend Center. Afterward, Hal Saunders described the origins and growth of the "sustained dialogue" program at Princeton and introduced guest speakers Janet Dickerson, university vice-president for student life, and three members of the classes of ’01, ’02, and ’03.

         RANDOM COMMENTS. Among those present for the class dinner were the scions of two deceased classmates: Maco Stewart's daughter, Macole, and Mac Fish's grandson, Howard MacFarland Fish, IV. Steve Rogers reported with regret that Harry Emlet's daughter, Susan Furst 178, died three days earlier. Suie and John McShane will soon leave their longtime home and move into a nearby retirement community. George Towner and his team are working overtime to ensure a successful Washington, D.C. mini-reunion. Projected attendance is now close to 300. Roger McLean has embarked on a campaign to have the exploits of Princeton and Harvard athletes at the first modern Olympics in Athens in 1896 publicly recognized when the Olympics return to that city in 2004. Speaking of track and field, Joe Bolster reminisced about an international meet in London in 1950 when he was a last-minute entry to run the mile against a field led by British track immortal Roger Bannister.

                                                                                                                      Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for March 26, 2003
(as submitted to the Alumni Weekly)

               WILDERNESS ADVENTURE. After graduation in 1952, Warren Bruce and Keq Kegerreis made a 140-mile canoe trip through the wilds of Ontario. Thereafter, they didn't see each other until the 50th. With renewed acquaintance came the decision to repeat their exploit of fifty years before. Older and wiser, the duo decided Virginia’s Rappahannock River offered a sufficient challenge. Shown here [watch for them in the printed edition] are Keg (left) and Warren taking a break during their post-Reunion adventure.

              WHAT'S IN A NAME? Doc Buyers was a four-sport athlete at Stony Brook Academy and subsequently was named to its sports hall of fame. Last year, Doc gave the school a new football stadium situated in the Buyers Park athletic complex. Meanwhile, in Metuchen, New Jersey, lifelong resident Don Kahn succeeded, after trying for six years, in persuading local and state officials to build a footbridge over an abandoned railroad right of way. The bridge finally opened to traffic last November. Don's jaw dropped when the dedication plaque was unveiled, and he saw that the bridge was now officially "Kahn's Crossing."

               A CAREER FOR GOOD VISION.  In 1962, new ophthalmologist Banks Anderson joined the staff of the Duke University Eye Center.  Last April, Banks' colleagues gathered to celebrate his forty years of service to the center.  At the observance, Banks was cited for his central role in making the center "one of the top ten (ophthalmology) programs in the world."

               REQUIESCAT.  The class has learned that Harry Dodge died August 1, 2002, in Lakewood, Colorado.

                                                                                                                        Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for March 12, 2003
(as submitted to the Alumni Weekly)

                    DOWN EAST. The Maine coast has proved a popular gathering place.  Shown here [sorry! the photo will be in the print version in the PAW] at the Kennebunkport home of Phil McMaster are, from left: Charlie Carpenter, Irv Cohen, Pat Russell, and their host.  This quartet of classmates is a doctors' foursome as well. Three are MDs, 1956 graduates from Johns Hopkins.  Odd man out is Irv Cohen, a psychology PhD from Columbia, who kindly submitted this photo. Farther east, in Falmouth, Geoff Nunes spent some time with John Parker, who sent this shot [again, in the print version] of Geoff displaying the orange and black float from one of John's lobster pots.

                   VOYAGERS. Not every one went to Maine. Bob Eby toured Italy and ran into Dom Telesco on Capri.  Phil May cruised the Danube and Rhine, taking time out to visit Reinhard Loosch in Germany and Wim van Eekelen in the Netherlands.  Dick Orr headed to Manila for the wedding of the daughter of an old family friend.

                                                                                                                        Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for February 26, 2003
(as submitted to the Alumni Weekly)

                    REQUIEM FOR A HEAVYWEIGHT. George Dean, our former class president, died January 10 in Bridgeport, Connecticut.  The following Wednesday, January 15, George's classmates, friends and neighbors - several hundred in all - packed Trinity Episcopal Church in Southport, Connecticut to celebrate his life and say a final farewell. It was an inspiring tribute to a man who left his mark on his profession, his community, and our class. Among at least 23 classmates on hand were George's closest friends at Princeton: Buzz Berckmans, Pete Cowles, Lefty Thomas, and John Winton. Lefty served as an usher while Buzz was one of three eulogists. Given the kind of man George was, each eulogy provoked laughter as well as a few tears. The best laugh line came during Buzz's account of George's Army service in Korea as an aide to a major general. The full text of Buzz's eulogy and the names of those classmates attending can be found on the class web page. Thanks to George Newlin and Mary Murdoch for their accounts of the service.

                    BALTIC STATES. Despite their heroic past and newly regained independence, the Baltic nations, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, are not on many travel itineraries. Nonetheless, four of our most peripatetic classmates descended on the region last year. Our trail riders, Chips Chester, Art Collins, and Bob Jiranek, have made their annual journeys on every continent save Australia. Last summer, they took their act to Estonia’s Lahemaa National Park and visited Latvia and Lithuania on the way home. Duke University sociology professor, Ed Tiryakian, has lectured or conferred on every continent including Australia. In October, he enlightened an audience in Talinn, Estonia after enjoying the season's first snowfall in Riga, Latvia.

                    REQUIESCAT. Don Jack notified the class that Fred Skok died January 10 in Cleveland.

                                                                                                                      Dan Duffield

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Class Notes for February 12, 2003
(as submitted to the Alumni Weekly)

               MINI XVIII. The mini-reunion scheduled for May 1-4, 2003 in Washington, DC is the eighteenth mini in class history and the third in the nation's capital. Led by Jerry Canter, Barry Loper, Steve Rogers, Hal Saunders, and George Towner, some two dozen classmates are determined to stage a memorable production. Absent our entrée to the White House in years past, we will still get an insider's view of the State Dept. and Supreme Court and a private introduction to special exhibits at the National Gallery of Art.  A dinner cruise on the Potomac and accommodations at first-class, downtown hotels are icing on the cake.  For more information, check the class website at http://alumni.princeton.edu/~cl1952 [see Washington Mini page].

               FIFTIETH POSTSCRIPTS.  For many classmates the Fiftieth Reunion shaped events during the rest of 2002. Bob Cowen endured two cancer surgeries in the five months before the 50th in order to be on time for the festivities.  Connie Smith's quintuple bypass kept him away, although he feels fine now. In Japan, any hope that Michiko and Hal Collins could negotiate the 9000 miles to Princeton vanished when their move into a new home was complicated by the effects of two typhoons, assorted earthquakes, and a "near miss" tornado.  Two who reuned then went home to face implacable surgeons.  Tom Daubert had a pacemaker installed.  About the same time, Al Gilgen had a lumbar spinal fusion operation. Ending on a lighter note, we come to Coke Florance who escorted Nancy Griscom to the 50th. On August 24, Coke and Nancy were married, as Coke reported, because Nancy "saw what a great class we had at reunions.”

              REQUIESCANT. The family notified the class that Frank McElhinney died November 7, 2002 in Pittsburgh.  Walter Smyth ’60 reported that Bruce Beery died December 23, 2002 in St. Petersburg, Florida.  [See also Memorial Page.]

Dan Duffield